What's New

See What's New on the NISIC Web site by using our RSS feed (about RSS). Contains items of interest that have been added to our site, in order of most recent post date. Items are kept in this section for a period of two years from post date.

Note: Oct 24, 2013 -- We have migrated our What's New section to a new interface (Drupal). If you have previously bookmarked our What's New section (weblogs.nal.usda.gov/invasivespecies), please update your bookmark to the new location (https://www.invasivespeciesinfo.gov/whats-new).

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Weed Science Society of America.

Both scientists and regulators have had a lot to say about the growing problem of herbicide resistance and how weed management techniques need to change in response. But there have been few organized opportunities for farmers to make their voices heard and to share their experiences in managing herbicide-resistant weeds.

 
Post Date: Mar 02, 2017


U.S. Department of Agriculture.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) today announced four grants totaling more than $13.6 million to combat a scourge on the nation's citrus industry, citrus greening disease, aka Huanglongbing. The funding is made possible through NIFA's Specialty Crop Research Initiative (SCRI) Citrus Disease Research and Extension Program, authorized by the 2014 Farm Bill.

 
Post Date: Jan 26, 2017


FederalRegister.gov.

This order amends Executive Order 13112 and directs actions to continue coordinated Federal prevention and control efforts related to invasive species. This order maintains the National Invasive Species Council (Council) and the Invasive Species Advisory Committee; expands the membership of the Council; clarifies the operations of the Council; incorporates considerations of human and environmental health, climate change, technological innovation, and other emerging priorities into Federal efforts to address invasive species; and strengthens coordinated, cost-efficient Federal action.

 
Post Date: Dec 05, 2016


DOI. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Injurious wildlife provision of the Lacey Act provides effective tool to halt the introduction and spread of species that have been identified as imminent and serious threats.

 
Post Date: Oct 03, 2016


USDA. Agricultural Research Service.

Along the Rio Grande in Texas, tiny insects are taking a big bite out of an invasive weed that competes for limited water resources vital to agriculture and native vegetation. Several years ago, ARS scientists released two insect species as part of a biocontrol program to kill giant reed (Arundo donax).

 
Post Date: Oct 03, 2016


USDA. APHIS. Hungry Pests.

April is Invasive Plant Pest and Disease Awareness Month, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is asking the public to help prevent the spread of invasive pests, which cost our nation an estimated $120 billion each year in damages to our environment, agriculture and native species. USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has identified 18 “Hungry Pests” as some of the most destructive invasive species that people can unknowingly spread in the things they move, pack and bring home from vacations. For more information, see top invasive pest threats.

 
Post Date: Apr 20, 2015