An official website of the United States government.

The .gov means it’s official.
Federal government websites always use a .gov or .mil domain. Before sharing sensitive information online, make sure you’re on a .gov or .mil site by inspecting your browser’s address (or “location”) bar.

This site is also protected by an SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) certificate that’s been signed by the U.S. government. The https:// means all transmitted data is encrypted — in other words, any information or browsing history that you provide is transmitted securely.

Home / Invasive Species - What's New on NISIC's Site

Invasive Species - What's New on NISIC's Site

See What's New on the NISIC's Web site by using our RSS feed (learn about RSS). Contains items of interest that have been added to our site, in order of most recent post date.

See related information: Invasive Species Resources - What's New
Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source. If you wish to search for species-related resources and use refinements, enter the species name first before selecting the terms.


Invasive Snakehead Caught in Canton, Massachusetts (Sep 2, 2021)
Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife.

On August 27, an angler caught a northern snakehead from Reservoir Pond in Canton, Massachusetts. After obtaining and analyzing the specimen, MassWildlife confirmed this fish was a snakehead, an invasive species in Massachusetts. This fish was most likely released by a pet owner when it grew too large for its aquarium. Possession and liberation of snakeheads are both illegal in Massachusetts. Transferring exotic fish into local waterways can cause a host of problems, including competition with native species and spread of disease. This recent catch is the fifth confirmed snakehead documented in Massachusetts since 2002. All snakeheads found in Massachusetts were adults, and MassWildlife has found no evidence of reproduction at any of the locations where the snakeheads were caught.

Anglers may confuse snakeheads with other native species like bowfin. Anyone who captures a fish that can be confidently identified as a snakehead should keep the fish, kill it, and report it to MassWildlife by emailing mass.wildlife@mass.gov or calling (508) 389-6300. MassWildlife encourages anglers who are less certain about the species of fish they have caught to send photos showing various angles of the fish. Under no circumstance should a suspected snakehead be transported to another location until identification is confirmed.

Post Date: Sep 20, 2021
New Research Provides Guidance for Effective Public Messaging About Invasive Species Prevention (Aug 20, 2021)
University of Wisconsin Sea Grant.

You could say that preventing the spread of aquatic invasive species (AIS) is a team sport. While it takes the professional efforts of natural resource managers, AIS specialists and others in the environmental field, it also takes the cooperation of the public. Yet for community members to take necessary actions, they must first be aware of the negative impacts AIS can have and how to stop their spread. Communicating with them about AIS in an effective way is vital.

New research from Wisconsin Sea Grant Aquatic Invasive Species Outreach Specialist Tim Campbell, University of Wisconsin-Madison Associate Professor Bret Shaw and consultant Barry T. Radler sheds new light on such communication. The researchers analyzed which communication strategies are most effective and which may pose unintended problems. The team's findings were published online Aug. 14 in the journal Environmental Management (“Testing Emphasis Message Frames and Metaphors on Social Media to Engage Boaters to Learn about Preventing the Spread of Zebra Mussels”).

Post Date: Sep 19, 2021
Reduce Invasive Pet and Plant Escapes (RIPPLE)
Michigan State University Extension.

The Reduce Invasive Pet and Plant Escapes (RIPPLE) program offers information to aquarium and water gardener professionals, retailers and hobbyists about what to do with unwanted plants and animals so they are not introduced into Michigan's lakes and streams.

Post Date: Sep 19, 2021
Discovery of Invasive Bug Bad News for State of Kansas (Sep 13, 2021)
Hays Post.

A 4-H student presenting a project at the Kansas State Fair has inadvertently triggered a state and federal investigation into a nasty, unwelcome bug. The student found the spotted lanternfly in Thomas County in western Kansas and included it in a 4-H entomology display.

Post Date: Sep 16, 2021
Charitable Dollars Help In Fight Against Invasives In National Park System (Aug 25, 2021)
National Parks Traveler.

National park philanthropy doesn't stop when it comes to trail and campground maintenance, science and research, or bringing inner-city youth to a park. Each year nearly $1.5 million from the National Park Foundation goes towards battling invasive species across the system.

Post Date: Sep 16, 2021
California Establishes Quarantine to Prohibit the Introduction of the Spotted Lanternfly into California (Jul 16, 2021)
California Department of Food and Agriculture.

A state exterior quarantine has been declared to prohibit the introduction of the spotted lanternfly (SLF), Lycorma delicatula, into California. Spotted lanternfly was first detected in North American in 2014 in Pennsylvania and has now spread to nine states. The quarantine prohibits the entry into California of SLF, its host plants, and a variety of articles, including conveyances, originating from any area where an SLF infestation exists.

If you believe you have seen the spotted lanternfly, please contact CDFA's Invasive Species Hotline at 1-800-491-1899, via Report a Pest, or by contacting your local County Agricultural Commissioner.

Post Date: Sep 11, 2021
USDA Hosting African Swine Fever Action Week September 13-17 (Sep 7, 2021)
USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

The United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) is hosting African Swine Fever (ASF) Action Week from September 13-17 – encouraging U.S. swine producers to join multiple webinars to learn about ASF and what they can do to help protect the U.S. swine herd. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack also recorded a video echoing the importance of keeping this devastating disease out of the United States.

Post Date: Sep 11, 2021
USDA Continuing African Swine Fever Prevention Efforts – Preparing to Establish Foreign Animal Disease Protection Zone (Aug 26, 2021)
USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

As part of its continuing efforts to respond to the detection of African Swine Fever (ASF) in the Dominican Republic (DR) and prevent its introduction into the Conterminous United States, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) is preparing to establish a Foreign Animal Disease protection zone in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. ASF has not been detected in Puerto Rico or the U.S. Virgin Islands, and USDA is committed to keeping it out of both islands and the rest of the United States. Out of an abundance of caution, APHIS is taking this additional action to further safeguard the U.S. swine herd and protect the interests and livelihoods of U.S. pork producers.

Post Date: Sep 05, 2021
Species Profile -- Asian Jumping Worm

Asian jumping worms are native to east-central Asia and have been present in the U.S. since the late 1800s, but have been recently invading natural habitats in the Northeast and Midwest. These worms were introduced possibly through the horticultural trade or by anglers using them as bait. Asian jumping worms affect forest habitats by altering soil properties, resulting in reduced food resources for native species.

Post Date: Sep 01, 2021
Species Profile -- English Ivy

English ivy is native to Europe and was introduced to the U.S. via the nursery trade. The earliest records of naturalization are from the 1870s. English ivy competes with native plants and can spread into tree canopies.

Post Date: Aug 31, 2021