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Home / Invasive Species - What's New on NISIC's Site

Invasive Species - What's New on NISIC's Site

See What's New on the NISIC's Web site by using our RSS feed (learn about RSS). Contains items of interest that have been added to our site, in order of most recent post date.

See also: Invasive Species Resources - What's New
Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source. If you wish to search for species-related resources and use refinements, enter the species name first before selecting the terms.


Wyoming Game and Fish Seeks Feedback on Aquatic Invasive Species Rapid Response Plans (Apr 19, 2021)
Wyoming Game and Fish Department.

For more than a decade the Wyoming Game and Fish Department has prioritized keeping aquatic invasive species (AIS) out of the state’s lakes and reservoirs. But, as the threat of zebra and quagga mussels grow, Game and Fish is taking extra precautions to prepare. This spring, the department is rolling out rapid response plans to help act quickly if AIS are discovered, and wants feedback from the public. Game and Fish is taking public comments until May 16, 2021 on 22 proposed plans for lakes and reservoirs throughout the state.

Post Date: Apr 24, 2021
Earth Day 2021: USDA Building in DC Illuminated by Green Lights to Signal the Importance of Preserving the Environment (Apr 22, 2021)
Federal News Network.

The lighting of USDA's Jamie L. Whitten Building is part of Invasive Plant Pest and Disease Awareness Month and United Nations International Year of the Plant Health Celebrations.

Post Date: Apr 22, 2021
USDA Encourages the Public to Protect Plants Against Invasive Pests in April (Apr 2, 2021)
USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) has declared April 2021 as Invasive Plant Pest and Disease Awareness Month (IPPDAM). The national outreach initiative enlists the public in the fight against invasive pests. These damaging invaders threaten our nation’s food crops, forests and natural resources. IPPDAM aims to raise public awareness about this threat, which can devastate agriculture, livelihoods and food security.

Post Date: Apr 14, 2021
Utah DWR and Partners Announce Revolutionary New Method for Decontaminating Boats, Removing Invasive Quagga Mussels (Apr 8, 2021)
Utah Department of Natural Resources. Division of Wildlife Resources.

The Utah Division of Wildlife Resources, Clean Wake LLC, the National Park Service at Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation and other partnering agencies are excited to announce a new first-of-its-kind dip tank method (YouTube video - Lake Powell AIS Dip Tank) that will revolutionize boat decontamination in the fight against invasive quagga mussels.

Post Date: Apr 10, 2021
Chinese Privet, Arthropods, and Bees (Apr 8, 2021)
USDA. FS. Southern Research Station. CompassLive.

Chinese privet (Ligustrum sinense) is one of the worst invasive plants in the South. It dominates the shrub layer and often becomes the only shrub underneath trees, especially in streamside areas. But insects and spiders living in fallen leaves and leaf litter were not affected by a privet invasion in Georgia, as a recent study shows.

Post Date: Apr 09, 2021
How Much Are Invasive Species Costing Us? (Mar 31, 2021)
French National Centre for Scientific Research.

Scientists from the CNRS, the IRD, and the Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle have just released the most comprehensive estimate to date of the financial toll of invasive species: nearly $1.3 trillion over four decades. Published in Nature (31 March 2021), their findings are based on the InvaCost database, which is financed by the BNP Paribas Foundation and the Paris-Saclay University Foundation’s AXA Chair of Invasion Biology. The annual expenses generated by biological invasions are only increasing, with no sign of any slowing.

Post Date: Apr 04, 2021
NAISMA Adds Mulch to Certified Weed Free Products Program (Mar 23, 2021)
North America Invasive Species Management Association.

The North American Invasive Species Management Association (NAISMA) announces a new addition to its Certified Weed Free Products Program: weed free mulch. Many federal, state, and local lands require the use of certified weed free forage, gravel, or mulch on their properties because invasive plants or noxious weeds cause serious harm to the environment, agriculture, and the economy. Once introduced, weeds can be difficult to control and expensive to manage.

Post Date: Mar 30, 2021
Coalition Allies Celebrate Applied Invasive Species Prevention (Mar 9, 2021)
North American Invasive Species Management Association.

A new invasive species coalition is celebrating significant milestones in preventing expansion of invasive species after the first anniversary of an important agreement. The North American Invasive Species Management Association, Wildlife Forever, the National Park Service, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service are working to implement on-the-ground strategies to engage the American public and help prevent the spread of invasive species under the new agreement.

Post Date: Mar 30, 2021
Worst Invasive Species Areas Ranked in Western States
Wildlife Forever.

Wildlife Forever has partnered with the United States Geological Survey (USGS) to map invasive species and their connection to congressional districts of the western United States. The new report commissioned by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) highlights 25 nonindigenous aquatic species (NAS) and ranks congressional districts’ level of infestations.  See Nonindigenous Aquatic Species in the West for more information and for the "Battle of the Bads!" report.

Post Date: Mar 29, 2021
Parts of US’s Southernmost States will "Tropicalize" as Climate Changes (Mar 17, 2021)
DOI. United States Geological Survey.

As climate change reduces the frequency and intensity of killing freezes, tropical plants and animals that once could survive in only a few parts of the U.S. mainland are expanding their ranges northward, a new U.S. Geological Survey-led study has found. The change is likely to result in some temperate zone plant and animal communities found today across the southern U.S. being replaced by tropical communities. These changes will have complex economic, ecological and human health consequences, the study predicts. Some effects are potentially beneficial, such as expanding winter habitat for cold-sensitive manatees and sea turtles; others pose problems, such as the spread of insect-borne human diseases and destructive invasive species.

Post Date: Mar 20, 2021