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Home / Invasive Species - What's New on NISIC's Site

Invasive Species - What's New on NISIC's Site

See What's New on the NISIC's Web site by using our RSS feed (learn about RSS). Contains items of interest that have been added to our site, in order of most recent post date.

See also: Invasive Species Resources - What's New
Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source. If you wish to search for species-related resources and use refinements, enter the species name first before selecting the terms.


Minnesota DNR Taking Aggressive Action in Mississippi River, Other Waters on Invasive Carp (May 6, 2021)
Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.

The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, in partnership with the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, the U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, is taking further action following the capture of 34 silver carp in Pool 8 of the Mississippi River near La Crosse, Wis. during a recent Modified Unified Method operation. The USGS-developed Modified Unified Method combines netting and herding techniques to drive and concentrate invasive carp from a large area of water into a small zone for removal.

Invasive carp captures must be reported to the DNR immediately by calling 651-587-2781 or emailing invasivecarp.dnr@state.mn.us. Take a photo and transport the carp to the nearest DNR fisheries office or make arrangements for it to be picked up by a DNR official. Do not release captured invasive carp.

Post Date: May 11, 2021
MDC Asks Anglers to Help Stop Invasive Round Gobies (May 6, 2021)
Missouri Department of Conservation.

Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) fisheries biologists say that the Show-Me-State has another aquatic invader to be on the watch for. It's already been detected in the Mississippi River near St. Louis—and anglers might be the first line of defense. The round goby (Neogobius melanostomus) is native to the Black and Caspian Seas between Europe and Asia and was brought to the U.S. by way of the Great Lakes in cargo ship ballast. Since then, the invasive fish has made its way down the Illinois River and has been confirmed just across the Mississippi at Alton, Illinois. MDC encourages anglers to take photos and email MDC with details if they encounter any round gobies. Anglers should report the sighting and email photos to MDCgoby@mdc.mo.gov.

Post Date: May 07, 2021
Forests for Bats: New Booklet for Landowners and Managers (May 6, 2021)
USDA. FS. Southern Research Station. CompassLive.

"Almost all North American bats rely on forests for survival," says Roger Perry, USDA Forest Service research wildlife biologist. Perry recently led the team that updated Forest Management and Bats, a booklet designed for private landowners and anyone managing forests. It was first published in 2006 by Bat Conservation International, and Daniel Taylor of BCI wrote the original version and contributed to the update. The updated publication is a 2020 product of the White-nose Syndrome National Plan.

Post Date: May 06, 2021
The Invasion of the Forest Destroyers - And how Science is Fighting Back (Apr 23, 2021)
USDA. Forest Service.

USDA Forest Service scientists are exploring the impacts of invasive species in forests and rangelands of the United States and developing early intervention strategies that land managers can take as well as strategies for restoring impacted landscapes.

Post Date: May 04, 2021
Firewood Transport as a Vector of Forest Pest Dispersal in North America: A Scoping Review (Feb 2021)
Cornell University. New York Invasive Species Research Institute.

A cozy campfire for summer days, a warm fireplace for winter evenings– the use of firewood is an "established cultural norm". However, moving firewood from place to place can have devastating consequences, as it can spread forest pests that decimate forests to collectively cost an estimated $4.2 – $14.4 billion per year. In order to better address the problem of people moving firewood and vectoring forest pests, Solano and colleagues examined trends and gaps in the existing literature on firewood and human-mediated forest pest movement in North America. The existing literature demonstrates the risk of firewood movement, but fails to address the level of awareness the public has on such risks, or the level of effectiveness of firewood regulations to prevent forest pest spread.

Post Date: May 01, 2021
Invasive Species Threats & Opportunities: A Primer for Oregon Policymakers (Feb 2021)
Oregon Invasive Species Council.

The Oregon Invasive Species Council is pleased to share Invasive Species Threats & Opportunities: A Primer for Oregon Policymakers. The primer includes an overview of the importance of prevention and rapid response to avoid widespread consequences, examples of invasive species of concern across the state and the pressing invasive species threats within the geographic regions of Oregon, an overview of the state invasive species programs and lead state agencies, and more. This publication was developed through a collaborative effort of the members of the Oregon Invasive Species Council to provide a briefing of selected serious threats from invasive species and opportunities to address these issues that span jurisdictions.

Post Date: Apr 30, 2021
More Zebra Mussels Found in Georgia: Public Urged to Keep Watch (Apr 20, 2021)
Georgia Department of Natural Resources. Wildlife Resources Division.

Wildlife officials are warning Georgia boat owners to be on the lookout for an invasive species that could cause millions of dollars in damages throughout the state. The Georgia Department of Natural Resources says zebra mussels, an eastern European species that is considered invasive, were found on a boat taken to Lake Lanier after being used on the Tennessee River near Chattanooga.

Post Date: Apr 27, 2021
Invasive Species Wikipedia Edit-a-thon (May 20, 2021)

Learn to edit Wikipedia and help improve articles about invasive species. Join the National Agricultural Library’s National Invasive Species Information Center to learn more about invasive species, their impacts, and their control.

The event scheduled from 11am-3pm will begin with an introduction and information about the Information Center and invasive species from Joyce Bolton, head of the National Invasive Species Information Center, and other guest speakers. Then, Jamie Flood, Wikipedian-in-residence of National Agricultural Library and Ariel Cetrone of Wikimedia D.C. will lead a one-hour training on Wikipedia editing and we will spend the rest of the day updating invasive species articles on Wikipedia. During the event experienced editors will be on hand to assist and answer questions.

Post Date: Apr 27, 2021
White-Nose Syndrome Killed Over 90% of Three North American Bat Species (Apr 21, 2021)
DOI. United States Geological Survey.

White-nose syndrome has killed over 90% of northern long-eared, little brown and tri-colored bat populations in fewer than 10 years, according to a new study published in Conservation Biology. Researchers also noted declines in Indiana bat and big brown bat populations. The findings, detailed in "The scope and severity of white-nose syndrome on hibernating bats in North America," underscore the devastating impacts of the deadly fungal disease. The research tapped into the most comprehensive data set on North American bat populations to date, which includes data from over 200 locations in 27 states and two Canadian provinces.

Post Date: Apr 24, 2021
USDA Asks for the Public's Help to Protect Citrus in Texas (Apr 20, 2021)
USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) employees in Zapata, Webb, Hidalgo, Willacy and Cameron Counties in Texas are working with the Texas Department of Agriculture (TDA) to inspect fruit trees in residential yards and commercial properties for signs of invasive citrus pests and diseases. Inspectors are hanging and servicing traps with lures set to combat fruit flies in those counties, while surveyors in South Texas examine citrus trees for signs of citrus canker and other diseases. These programs are a collaborative effort with TDA and the citrus industry to protect Texas citrus. APHIS asks residents and business owners to help limit the spread of citrus pests and diseases by cooperating with survey teams and allowing them to access your property for survey work.

Post Date: Apr 24, 2021