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Invasive Species - What's New on NISIC's Site

See What's New on the NISIC's Web site by using our RSS feed (learn about RSS). Contains items of interest that have been added to our site, in order of most recent post date.

View related information: Resource Search - What's New
Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source. If you wish to search for species-related resources and use refinements, enter the species name first before selecting the terms.

Recent News

  • DOI Funding Guide for Invasive Species Management [PDF, 540 KB]

    • Sep 2022
    • United States Department of the Interior.

    • This funding guide includes information on DOI funding opportunities that could support projects that manage invasive species (e.g., prevention, detection, control/eradication, restoration). It is important to note that information is subject to change. All funding opportunities are subject to the availability of appropriated funds; a program that is listed may not offer funding in any given year. The guide is a starting point. Other DOI funding opportunities may exist that are not included here or that are broader in scope yet could be appropriate for invasive species management. This product helps to advance implementation of the DOI Invasive Species Strategic Plan by increasing awareness of Interior's financial assistance programs that may be available to fund invasive species management activities.
      See also: DOI Invasive Species Coordination for related information

    • Post Date
      Sep 26, 2022
  • Service Proposes to List the Tricolored Bat as Endangered Under the Endangered Species Act: Ongoing spread of white-nose syndrome is primary threat, increasing risk of extinction

    • Sep 13, 2022
    • DOI. Fish and Wildlife Service.

    • The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced a proposal to list the tricolored bat as endangered under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The species faces extinction due primarily to the range-wide impacts of white-nose syndrome, a deadly disease affecting cave-dwelling bats across the continent.

      Bats are essential for healthy ecosystems and contribute at least $3 billion annually to the U.S. agriculture economy through pest control and pollination. The growing extinction crisis highlights the importance of the ESA and efforts to conserve species before declines become irreversible.
      See also: Related story (Sep 13, 2020) - How the USFWS and its partners are working to keep this little bat from vanishing forever

    • Post Date
      Sep 15, 2022
  • BioOne VISTA - Plant Sciences (requires login)

    • Sep 2022
    • BioOne Complete.

    • BioOne VISTA is a monthly collection of recently published articles highlighting timely subjects and themes in the biological, ecological, and environmental sciences.

      The September 2022 edition focuses on research in BioOne Complete about invasive and non-native plant species. Invasive species can be detrimental to ecosystems. Invasive plant species can change native plant communities, prevent forest regeneration, and even change the soil chemistry of an area. Understanding how non-native and invasive plants impact habitats around the world is an important step in combating the problems they present.

    • Post Date
      Sep 15, 2022
  • NAISMA Biocontrol Factsheets

    • North American Invasive Species Management Association.

    • The NAISMA Classical Biocontrol Committee is excited to announce new peer-reviewed weed biocontrol publications for use by managers and landowners. Subject matter experts are developing a series of factsheets that cover invasive plants and their associated biological control agents in North America. Funding for these factsheets is provided by the United State Forest Service. NAISMA is partnering with iBiocontrol.org to host these publications.

    • Post Date
      Sep 14, 2022
  • Invasive Species are Changing the Nature of the Mediterranean Sea

    • Sep 5, 2022
    • UN. Food and Agriculture Organization.

    • The Mediterranean Sea is being invaded by hundreds of fish, jellyfish, prawns and other marine species from outside the region. More than 1 000 non-indigenous species have been identified in the Mediterranean and the Black Sea. Over half have established permanent populations and are spreading, causing concern about the threat they pose to marine ecosystems and local fishing communities.

      “Climate change and human activities have had a profound impact on the Mediterranean and the Black Sea,” says Stefano Lelli, a fishery expert for the eastern Mediterranean working for the General Fisheries Commission for the Mediterranean (GFCM). This regional fisheries management body, established by FAO, is leading efforts to promote sustainable fisheries and aquaculture in the Mediterranean and the Black Sea.

    • Post Date
      Sep 05, 2022
  • Mexican Fruit Fly Quarantine in Portion of San Diego County

    • Aug 24, 2022
    • California Department of Food and Agriculture.

    • A portion of San Diego County has been placed under quarantine for the Mexican fruit fly following the detection of six flies and one larva in and around the unincorporated area of Valley Center. The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), the San Diego County Agricultural Commissioner, and the California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) are working collaboratively on this project.

      The Mexican fruit fly can lay its eggs in and infest more than 50 types of fruits and vegetables, severely impacting California agricultural exports and backyard gardens alike. For more information on the pest, please see the pest profile at: www.cdfa.ca.gov/plant/go/MexFly. Residents who believe their fruits and vegetables may be infested with fruit fly larvae are encouraged to call the state’s toll-free Pest Hotline at 1-800-491-1899.

    • Post Date
      Sep 01, 2022
  • Play Clean Go: Work.Clean.Go.

    • North American Invasive Species Management Association.

    • As a resource professional (construction, agriculture, horticulture/growers, road crews) you see firsthand what invasive species can do to the landscape, so it is important that you remain vigilant in your own prevention actions. You and the work that you do as an outdoor professional play a crucial role to the success of biodiversity and reducing the spread of invasive species. Learn how you can prevent the spread of invasive species.

    • Post Date
      Aug 31, 2022
  • State Agricultural Officials Ask Residents to Report Sightings of the Invasive Spotted Lanternfly: Hampden County Find Indicates Species Is Continuing to be Found in New Areas

    • Aug 9, 2022
    • Massachusetts Department of Agricultural Resources.

    • The Massachusetts Department of Agricultural Resources (MDAR) today announced that an infestation of the invasive insect known as spotted lanternfly (SLF) was found in the City of Springfield last week. "With new populations of the spotted lanternfly likely to pop up more and more frequently as the invasive pest becomes established across the northeast, it is critical that we all remain diligent in identifying them early onAnyone who sees this pest is asked to report it promptly. Early detection will help limit the spread of spotted lanternfly and give orchards, farms, and other growers time to prepare."

      Anyone who has recently received goods or materials from states where SLF is known to have been introduced (including Connecticut, Delaware, Indiana, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia; see SLF-infested states) should also be on the lookout. Additionally, if a spotted lanternfly is found, the public is asked to take a photo or collect the specimen, and report the sighting using MDAR’s SLF online reporting form.

    • Post Date
      Aug 31, 2022
  • Minnesota DNR, USFWS Using eDNA to Learn About Invasive Carp

    • Aug 12, 2022
    • Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.

    • The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service have been using environmental DNA (or eDNA) technology to detect invasive carp in the St. Croix, Mississippi and Minnesota rivers. May sampling in the St. Croix River showed silver carp eDNA about four miles north of where invasive carp have been confirmed in the St. Croix. eDNA is DNA released from an organism into the environment that is detectable at very low concentrations.

      Invasive carp captures must be reported to the DNR immediately by calling 651-587-2781 or emailing invasivecarp.dnr@state.mn.us. Take a photo and transport the carp to the nearest DNR fisheries office or make arrangements for it to be picked up by a DNR official. Do not release captured invasive carp. A permit can be requested to keep captured invasive carp for consumption or disposal.

    • Post Date
      Aug 15, 2022
  • Invasive Pests Have Cost New Zealand Billions

    • Aug 15, 2022
    • University of Aberdeen (United Kingdom).

    • Invasive species are well known for their huge ecological costs, but they also bring a massive economic burden with sociological, environmental and health impacts. New research led by the University of Aberdeen and the University of Auckland in collaboration with CNRS, France has established that invasive species have cost the New Zealand economy almost $100 billion in the last 50 years. While damage costs remain high, this total includes spending far more than most other countries on pre and post-invasion management techniques relative to its GDP.

    • Post Date
      Aug 15, 2022