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Home / Invasive Species - What's New on NISIC's Site

Invasive Species - What's New on NISIC's Site

See What's New on the NISIC's Web site by using our RSS feed (learn about RSS). Contains items of interest that have been added to our site, in order of most recent post date.

See also: Invasive Species Resources - What's New
Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source. If you wish to search for species-related resources and use refinements, enter the species name first before selecting the terms.


USDA and CFIA Establish Protocol to Minimize Trade Disruptions in the Event of an African Swine Fever Detection in Feral Swine (Mar 16, 2021)
USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) have developed a protocol to help ensure bilateral trade will continue if African swine fever (ASF) is detected in feral swine in either country, while still absent from domestic swine. The intent of the protocol is to protect swine populations in both countries during an outbreak of ASF in feral swine, while minimizing impacts on the trade of live swine, swine products, and other swine commodities.

Post Date: Mar 20, 2021
Asian Giant Hornet Public Dashboard
Washington State Department of Agriculture.

The Asian Giant Hornet Public Dashboard shares detection and trapping data. Citizen scientists were able to view detections in real time, including the number of reported sightings and number of hornets confirmed by type. Coordinating this information provided input on future trapping and demonstrated the benefit of collaboration with citizen scientists. WSDA has indicated that citizen data sharing and bottle trapping efforts are crucial to protect Washington from this invasive species.

Post Date: Mar 19, 2021
Invasive Species Data Citizen Science Data Critical to Fighting the Asian Giant Hornet (Mar 3, 2021)
Western Governor's Association.

This article highlights the role of data in responding to the Asian giant hornet and describes how officials at the Washington State Department of Agriculture employed 'citizen scientists' and ‘cooperators’ to locate and eradicate a nest of deadly Asian giant hornets in their state.
See also:
Western Governors' Association Launches Invasive Species Data Mobilization Campaign (Dec 18, 2020)

Post Date: Mar 19, 2021
U of M Scientists Discover Attacking Fungi That Show Promise Against Emerald Ash Borer (Mar 10, 2021)
University of Minnesota.

New research from the University of Minnesota’s Minnesota Invasive Terrestrial Plants and Pests Center (MITPPC) shows a possible path forward in controlling the invasive pest, the emerald ash borer (EAB), that threatens Minnesota’s nearly one billion ash trees.

In a recent study published in Fungal Biology, MITPPC researchers identified various fungi living in EAB-infested trees — a critical first step in finding fungi that may be harnessed to control the spread of EAB, and ultimately, prevent ash tree death. 

Post Date: Mar 16, 2021
Zebra Mussels Found in Aquarium Moss Balls (Mar 12, 2021)

Invasive zebra mussels have been found in "moss balls” an aquarium plant product sold at aquarium and pet supply stores.  Zebra mussels are regarded as one of the most destructive invasive species in North America. Learn more about the situation, rapid response efforts by federal and state agencies, and how to properly destroy the moss balls to prevent the spread of zebra mussels.

Post Date: Mar 12, 2021
Invasive Species Alert: Zebra Mussels in Aquarium Moss Balls (Mar 5, 2021) (PDF | 756 KB)
Pet Industry Joint Advisory Council.

Update: Invasive Zebra Mussels Found in Pets Stores in 21 States (Mar 8, 2021; U.S. Geological Survey Press Release). Agencies, industry in coordinated response to help stores and consumers find and destroy troublesome shellfish.

The Pet Industry Joint Advisory Council wishes to inform you of an important invasive species threat that was recently discovered in the U.S. Zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha), which are regarded as one of the most troublesome invasive species in North America, have been discovered within a variety of moss ball products designed for aquarium use, including products being sold and used in aquariums in stores in multiple states, including Oregon, Washington and Florida.

Specifically identified in a report from the U.S. Geological Survey Nonindigenous Aquatic Species Database, a release from the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and a press release from Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks, PIJAC urges you to take immediate action to inspect your fish tanks and take action as necessary. For more information on how to dispose of recently-purchased moss balls, see Zebra Mussel Disposal from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Post Date: Mar 06, 2021
Spatially Targeted Drone Carries Biocontrol Weevil to Hard-to-Reach Patches of Mile-a-Minute Weed (2020)
USDA. FS. Northern Research Station.

Inadvertently introduced in the northeastern United States in the 1930s, mile-a-minute weed is a highly aggressive invasive plant that is replacing native species in many areas of the Nation. While a biocontrol agent has been identified, finding and reaching dense patches of mile-a-minute weeds has been a problem for land managers. The solution may be drones carrying environmentally friendly pods packed with tiny weevils.

Post Date: Feb 27, 2021
Florida FWC Approves Rule Changes to Help Protect Florida from 16 High-Risk Invasive Reptiles (Feb 25, 2021)
Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.

At its February 2021 meeting, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) approved staff recommendations to create new rules to address the importation, breeding and possession of high-risk invasive reptiles. The approved rule changes to Chapter 68-5, F.A.C. specifically address Burmese pythons, Argentine black and white tegus, green iguanas and 13 other high-risk nonnative snakes and lizards that pose a threat to Florida’s ecology, economy, and human health and safety. For more information, see New Rules for Invasive Nonnative Reptiles.

Post Date: Feb 27, 2021
Spread the Word, Not the Weeds (Feb 22, 2021)
USDA. Blog.

Deceptively delicate and fragile in appearance, the Eurasian watermilfoil forms thick mats in shallow areas of a lake, quickly growing and spreading to block sunlight, killing off native aquatic plants that fish and other underwater species rely on for food and shelter. In North America, the plant threatens the diversity and abundance of native plants as well as the ecological balance of lakes and ponds, which in turn adversely affects recreational opportunities. If left unchecked, invasive watermilfoil will spread through a lake, or even to other lakes by transmission. An expert team of USDA Forest Service divers with invasive species and aquatics expertise is focused on rooting out the plant.

Post Date: Feb 26, 2021
WEBINAR: WGA Launches Invasive Species Data Mobilization Campaign (Dec 18, 2020)
Western Governors Association.

The Invasive Species Data Mobilization Campaign of the Western Governors’ Association seeks to encourage national, state, and local land managers, private landowners, and non-governmental organizations to enter previously unavailable data into new or existing invasive species data management platforms using recommendations developed by WGA and invasive species data experts.

High-quality information is an essential weapon in the fight against invasive species in the West. Land managers, conservation groups, industry, and private landowners need accurate, current regional invasive species occurrence data. Technological barriers and standardization issues, however, often prevent wide sharing of useful invasive species occurrence data.

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Post Date: Feb 26, 2021