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Wild Boar

Scientific Name

Sus scrofa Linnaeus, 1758 (ITIS)

Common Name

Wild boar, wild hog, feral pig, feral hog, Old World swine, razorback, Eurasian wild boar, Russian wild boar

Native To
Date of U.S. Introduction
Means of Introduction

Imported as a food source and escaped from domestication or were intentionally released (Rouhe and Sytsma 2007)

Impact

Damages native plants and crops and competes with native species (Rouhe and Sytsma 2007)

Wild boar - invasive.org

Wild Boar, Management

Credit

Billy Higginbotham Texas AgriLife Extension Service

Find more images

Spotlights

  • Help USDA Estimate Feral Swine Damage to U.S. Agriculture

    • Jul 22, 2022
    • USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

    • USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS), in coordination with the National Feral Swine Damage Management Program, is conducting a Feral Swine Survey. NASS mailed questionnaires to more than 11,000 producers growing corn, soybeans, wheat, rice, peanuts, and sorghum in Alabama, Arkansas, California, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Texas during the last week of June 2022. If you or someone you know received a survey, please be sure to send in your responses by August 12, 2022. Use the Respondent Portal to complete surveys, track upcoming surveys, view data visualizations and reports, and more.

  • History Highlight: APHIS Establishes National Program to Combat Destructive Feral Swine

    • Jun 22, 2022
    • USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

    • Wild boar, razorback, feral hog, wild pig—those are just a few of the names for one of the most destructive, formidable invasive species in the United States. Estimates vary, but their population likely exceeds 6 million nationwide. They cause tremendous damage—up to $2.5 billion annually—to crops, forestry, livestock, and pastures.

      To combat these threats, APHIS established the National Feral Swine Damage Management Program in 2014. The program’s overarching goal is to protect agricultural and natural resources, property, animal health, and human health and safety by managing feral swine damage. APHIS collaborates with many stakeholders—including States, Tribes, other Federal agencies, universities, and the public—to accomplish this goal.

  • USDA Invests $11.65 Million to Control Destructive Feral Swine

    • Jan 13, 2021
    • United States Department of Agriculture.

    • The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is investing $11.65 million in 14 projects to help agricultural producers and private landowners trap and control feral swine as part of the Feral Swine Eradication and Control Pilot Program. This investment expands the pilot program to new projects in Alabama, Hawaii, Mississippi, Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina and Texas. This pilot program is a joint effort between USDA's Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) and USDA's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS).

      This second round of funding is for partners to carry out activities as part of the identified pilot projects in select states. "These awards enable landowners to address the threat that feral swine pose to natural resources and agriculture," NRCS Acting Chief Kevin Norton said. "The projects we have identified will be key to addressing the feral swine problem."

  • Feral Hog Invasions Leave Coastal Marshes More Susceptible to Climate Change

    • Nov 16, 2021
    • Duke University. Nicholas School of the Environment.

    • Coastal marshes that have been invaded by feral hogs recover from disturbances up to three times slower than non-invaded marshes and are far less resilient to sea-level rise, extreme drought and other impacts of climate change, a new study led by scientists at Duke University and the University of Massachusetts Boston (UMB) finds. "Under normal circumstances, marshes can handle and recover from drought or sea level rise, given time, but there is no safety net in place for hog invasions," said Brian Silliman, Rachel Carson Distinguished Professor of Marine Conservation Biology at Duke, who co-authored the study.

  • African Swine Fever - Report Feral Swine [PDF | 365 KB]

    • May 2020
    • USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

    • Feral swine can carry foreign animal diseases like African Swine Fever. While ASF has never been found in domestic or feral swine in the United States, there is no treatment or vaccine for it. That’s why surveillance is very important. Help protect U.S. pigs by immediately reporting sick or dead feral swine.

      WHAT TO DO: If you find a sick or dead feral swine with no obvious injury or cause of death, report it right away. Call the USDA-APHIS Wildlife Services program in your State at 1-866-4-USDA-WS. Don’t wait! Quick detection is essential to preventing the spread of ASF.

  • Northwest Climate Hub - Feral Swine in the Northwest

    • United States Department of Agriculture. USDA Climate Hubs.

    • Feral swine have recently invaded parts of the Northwest. They have been invading southwestern and central Oregon since 2004 and were first detected in Washington in 2016. Idaho has not seen significant numbers of feral swine, however migrating pigs may pose a threat. The population growth potential of feral swine is closely associated with food availability, which is becoming more abundant year-round due to warmer winter conditions that are linked to climate change. Projected increases in extreme events and average summer temperatures in the region are not expected to negatively impact the success of feral pigs. In response, timely population control measures are necessary to avoid damage to crops, forests, and rangelands.

Distribution / Maps / Survey Status

Videos

Selected Resources

The section below contains highly relevant resources for this species, organized by source.

Council or Task Force
Partnership
Federal Government
International Government
State and Local Government
Academic
Professional
Citations