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Scotch Broom

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Scotch Broom
Scotch broom, foliage in Alaska - Photo by Tom Heutte; USDA, Forest Service
Scientific Name: 
Cytisus scoparius (L.) Link (ITIS)
Common Name: 
Scotch broom, broomtops, common broom, European broom, Irish broom, English broom
Native To: 
Europe and North Africa (Zouhar 2005)
Date of U.S. Introduction: 
1800s (Zouhar 2005)
Means of Introduction: 
Introduced as an ornamental or possibly as livestock fodder (Mack 2003; Zouhar 2005)
Impact: 
Forms dense stands which crowd out native species and destroy wildlife habitat (Zouhar 2005)

Spotlights

Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office. Washington Invasive Species Council.

The Washington Invasive Species Council, state agencies and researchers are calling for a census in May to help determine the location of Scotch broom throughout the state. "We need everyone's help to size up the problem," said Justin Bush, executive coordinator of the Washington Invasive Species Council. "Without baseline information about the location and population size, we don’t have enough details to determine solutions. The information from the census will help us set short- and long-term action plans." Yellow flowered, Scotch broom is hard to miss when blooming. It can be found in 30 of Washington's 39 counties (PDF | 282 KB). While known to be spread across the state, specific locations and patch sizes are not well documented, leading to the council's call for a month-long census.

"We're asking people to send us information from their neighborhoods," Bush said. "The information can be transmitted easily to the council by using the Washington Invasives mobile app or by visiting https://invasivespecies.wa.gov/report-a-sighting/. Sightings should include a photograph of the plant that shows enough detail that the plant can be verified by an expert. A description of the size of the patch is also helpful, such as whether the patch is the size of a motorcycle, a car, a school bus or multiple school buses. Photographs also can be shared with the council on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter by using the hashtags #TheGreatScotchBroomCensus and #ScotchBroom2020Census."

Distribution / Maps / Survey Status

University of Georgia. Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health.
Provides state, county, point and GIS data. Maps can be downloaded and shared.

Images

University of Georgia. Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health.

Videos

Google. YouTube; Montana Department of Agriculture.

Selected Resources

The section below contains highly relevant resources for this species, organized by source. Or, to display all related content view all resources for Scotch Broom.

Council or Task Force

Invasive Species Council of British Columbia (Canada).

See also: Publications for more resources

California Invasive Plant Council.

In online book: Bossard, C.C., J.M. Randall, and M.C. Hoshovsky (Editors). 2000. Invasive Plants of California's Wildlands. University of California Press. Berkeley, CA

Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office. Washington Invasive Species Council.

Partnership
University of Alaska - Anchorage. Alaska Center for Conservation Science.
See also: Non-Native Plant Species List for additional factsheets (species biographies) and species risk assessment reports of non-native species present in Alaska and also non-native species currently not recorded in Alaska (potential invasives)
IUCN. Species Survival Commission. Invasive Species Specialist Group.
University of Georgia. Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health.
USDA. FS. Institute of Pacific Islands Forestry.

Centre for Invasive Species Solutions; Atlas of Living Australia; Australian Government. Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment.

Designated Weed of National Significance

Federal Government

DOI. NPS. Science of the American Southwest.

See also: Invasive Plant Species for more fact sheets
USDA. FS. Rocky Mountain Research Station. Fire Sciences Laboratory.
USDA. NRCS. National Plant Data Center.

USDA. ARS. National Genetic Resources Program. GRIN-Global.

International Government

Victoria Department of Jobs, Precincts and Regions (Australia). Agriculture.

State and Local Government

Thurston County Public Health and Social Services (Washington). Environmental Health.

See also: IPM for Homeowners & Land Managers for more species
Plumas-Sierra Noxious Weeds Management Group (California).
See also: Agricultural Brochures for more species
Washington State Noxious Weed Control Board.
California Department of Food and Agriculture.
See also: Included on California's noxious weed list; see Encycloweedia: Program Details for additional resources
King County Department of Natural Resources (Washington). Water and Land Resources Division.

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

Academic
University of California. Weed Research and Information Center.
See also: Weeds in Natural Areas for more information sheets
University of Idaho; Oregon State University; Washington State University. Pacific Northwest Extension.
Montana State University Extension.
Columbia University. Center for Environmental Research and Conservation.
University of California. Statewide Integrated Pest Management Program.
See also: Pest Notes are peer-reviewed scientific publications about specific pests or pest management topics, directed at California's home and landscape audiences.
Professional
Montana Weed Control Association.

Citations