An official website of the United States government.

Official websites use .gov
A .gov website belongs to an official government organization in the United States.

Secure .gov websites use HTTPS
A lock ( ) or https:// means you've safely connected to the .gov website. Share sensitive information only on official, secure websites.

Spotted Lanternfly

Scientific Name

Lycorma delicatula (White) (Barringer et al. 2015)

Common Name

Spotted lanternfly (SLF)

Native To
Date of U.S. Introduction

First detected in 2014, but appeared to have been present in the U.S. for 2-3 years (Dara et al. 2015; Barringer et al. 2015)

Means of Introduction

Possible pathways include imported woody plants, wood products, and other commodities (EPPO 2016)

Impact

Poses a serious economic threat to multiple U.S. industries, including viticulture, fruit trees, ornamentals and timber (Urban et al.)

Spotted lanternfly

Spotted lanternfly, adult

Credit

Photo by Lawrence Barringer, Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture

Find more images

Spotlights

  • PPQ-Trained Detector Dogs Track Down Lanternflies and Beetles

    • Jan 31, 2022
    • USDA. APHIS. Plant Protection Today.

    • They’re coming to get you, spotted lanternflies and Japanese beetles! Detector canines—trained by USDA's Plant Protection and Quarantine (PPQ) program—are ready to sniff out these damaging invasive pests to detect them early and prevent their spread. These highly trained dogs represent some of the recent successes of our Agricultural Detector Canines strategic initiative. Its goal is to expand the use of detector dogs to enhance domestic pest surveys, detect pests early, and facilitate the trade of U.S. agricultural products.
      See also: National Detector Dog Training Center

  • APHIS Issues Supplemental Environmental Assessment for the Spotted Lanternfly Program

    • Nov 8, 2021
    • USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

    • The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has completed a supplemental environmental assessment (EA) required under the National Environmental Policy Act for its spotted lanternfly program. The previous EA for the spotted lanternfly program was finalized in June 2020 and included control and monitoring activities in the mid-Atlantic Region, Kentucky, North Carolina, and Ohio.

      The spotted lanternfly may occur on a variety of plant species, including tree-of-heaven, grapevine, stone fruits (apricot, cherry, nectarine, peach, and plum), and other tree species (apple, oak, pine, poplar, and walnut). If allowed to spread, this pest may be harmful to grape, apple, peach, stone fruit, and logging industries. APHIS is publishing the supplemental EA at https://www.regulations.gov/ and on the APHIS website (PDF | 2.5 MB).

  • California Establishes Quarantine to Prohibit the Introduction of the Spotted Lanternfly into California

    • Jul 16, 2021
    • California Department of Food and Agriculture.

    • A state exterior quarantine has been declared to prohibit the introduction of the spotted lanternfly (SLF), Lycorma delicatula, into California. Spotted lanternfly was first detected in North American in 2014 in Pennsylvania and has now spread to nine states. The quarantine prohibits the entry into California of SLF, its host plants, and a variety of articles, including conveyances, originating from any area where an SLF infestation exists.

      If you believe you have seen the spotted lanternfly, please contact CDFA's Invasive Species Hotline at 1-800-491-1899, via Report a Pest, or by contacting your local County Agricultural Commissioner.

  • Discovery of Invasive Bug Bad News for State of Kansas

    • Sep 13, 2021
    • Hays Post.

    • A 4-H student presenting a project at the Kansas State Fair has inadvertently triggered a state and federal investigation into a nasty, unwelcome bug. The student found the spotted lanternfly in Thomas County in western Kansas and included it in a 4-H entomology display.

  • Spotted Lanternfly Found in Indiana

    • Jul 23, 2021
    • Indiana Department of Natural Resources.

    • Spotted lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula) was found in Indiana for the first time in Switzerland County earlier this week, the farthest west the insect has been found. A homeowner in Vevay contacted DNR’s Division of Entomology & Plant Pathology (DEPP) with a picture that was taken outside his home of a fourth instar, or developmental stage, larvae. DEPP staff surveyed the site and discovered an infestation in the woodlot adjacent to a few homes in the area. DEPP and USDA are conducting an investigation to determine exactly how large the infestation is and where it could have come from, as well as how to limit the spread and eradicate the population.

      The Indiana DNR is asking for all citizens to keep an eye out for spotted lanternfly. The bright color of both the last instars and the adults of the insect should be present at this time of the year. Anyone that spots signs of the spotted lanternfly should contact DEPP by calling 866-NO EXOTIC (866-663-9684) or send an email to DEPP@dnr.IN.gov.

  • Spotted Lanternfly, an Invasive Pest Targeting Plants and Trees, Detected for First Time in Rhode Island

    • Aug 6, 2021
    • Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management.

    • The Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management (DEM) announces that the spotted lanternfly (SLF), an exotic pest that targets various plants and trees, has been detected for the first time in Rhode Island. Native to Asia, SLF is most commonly associated with "Tree of Heaven" (Ailanthus altissima) plants and also feeds on a wide variety of agricultural crops such as grape, apple and hops; and several native species of plants and trees including maple, walnut and willow.

      A single SLF was found in an industrial/commercial area in Warwick near Jefferson Blvd, and a photo of the insect was sent to DEM through its online agricultural pest alert system. DEM's Division of Agriculture confirmed the sighting on August 2 and is asking the public to report any suspected sightings at www.dem.ri.gov/spottedlanternfly. No known population of SLF is currently present in this area. DEM will be conducting an extensive survey of the area based on US Department of Agriculture (USDA) recommendations to determine if there is any further presence of the invasive insect and will be providing outreach materials to businesses in the area.

  • Oregon Nursery Finds Destructive Spotted Lanternfly, First Ever Reported in Oregon

    • Oct 8, 2020
    • Oregon Department of Agriculture.

    • A dead spotted lanternfly (SLF), Lycorma delicatula, has been found in a shipment of planters and ceramic pots sent to Oregon from Pennsylvania. Recently, a nursery in the Corvallis area found the dead female specimen and called the Oregon Department of Agriculture (ODA) Insect Pest Prevention and Management Program (1-800-525-0137) to report. The SLF poses a threat to tree fruit and grape production. Grapes used for wine are a high value crop in Oregon, valued at more than $238 million in 2019. This invasive pest also prefers a broad range of more than 70 plant species including apples, cherry, chestnut, hops, maple, peaches, pear, pine, plum, poplar, oak, rose and walnut.

      SLF was first found in North America in 2014, in Pennsylvania. It is believed to have arrived on shipments of stone from China. Since then, SLF has been detected in 11 eastern states (Connecticut, Delaware, Massachusetts, Maryland, North Carolina, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia and West Virginia). If you believe you have found SLF, please notify the Oregon Department of Agriculture immediately by calling 1-800-525-0137 or email plant-entomologist@oda.state.or.us.

Distribution / Maps / Survey Status

Videos

Selected Resources

The section below contains highly relevant resources for this species, organized by source.

Partnership
Federal Government
International Government
State and Local Government
Academic
  • Pest Alert: Spotted Lanternfly is an Invasive Insect That May Impact Oregon

    • Mar 2021
    • Oregon State University. Extension Service.

  • Invasive Species & Exotic Pests: Spotted Lanternfly

  • Invasive Insects - Spotted Lanternfly [PDF | 240 KB]

    • May 2018
    • University of Maryland Extension.

    • See also: Spotted Lanternfly for more resources

  • Fact Sheets - Insects and Mites: Spotted Lanternfly

    • University of Massachusetts Extension. Landscape, Nursery, and Urban Forestry Program.

  • Spotted Lanternflies Land in New Jersey

    • Rutgers University. New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station.

    • In the U.S., spotted lanternfly is an invasive species that could be very devastating to some New Jersey crops and hardwood trees. New Jersey populations were first detected in 2018 and are currently primarily distributed along the state's border with Pennsylvania. In response, the NJ Department of Agriculture has issued an eight-county quarantine. People and businesses travelling in and out of these counties (Burlington, Camden, Gloucester, Hunterdon, Mercer, Salem, Somerset, and Warren) should inspect their vehicles for hitchhiking SLF as well as inspect outdoor items such as firewood, paving stones, lawn equipment, etc. for egg masses (see checklist (PDF | 222 KB)). Quarantine compliance will reduce the spread of SLF to new areas and counties thereby protecting New Jersey resources including forests and agriculture. To help survey efforts, please report sightings (with photograph) to slanternfly@njaes.rutgers.edu.

  • Spotted Lanternfly

    • Pennsylvania State University. Cooperative Extension.

  • Spotted Lanternfly in Virginia

    • Virginia Tech; Virginia State University. Virginia Cooperative Extension.

    • A potentially very serious pest of grapes, peaches, hops, and a variety of other crops, the spotted lanternfly (SLF), Lycorma delicatula, was detected in Frederick County, Virginia, on Jan. 10, 2018. It is important to look for it and report any finds. The spotted lanternfly has also been reported on a range of ornamentals around the home and in the landscape; in high numbers, the insect can become a nuisance pest to homeowners.

Citations