An official website of the United States government.

Official websites use .gov
A .gov website belongs to an official government organization in the United States.

Secure .gov websites use HTTPS
A lock ( ) or https:// means you've safely connected to the .gov website. Share sensitive information only on official, secure websites.

Mexican Fruit Fly

Scientific Name

Anastrepha ludens (Loew, 1873) (ITIS)

Common Name

Mexican fruit fly, Mexfly

Synonym

Anastrepha lathana, Trypeta ludens (ITIS)

Native To

Mexico and Central America (Flitters and Messenger 1965)

Date of U.S. Introduction

First observed as a winter migrant in southern Texas in 1903, with infestations occurring beginning in 1927; it was first discovered outside of its usual range in 1954 (Flitters and Messenger 1965)

Means of Introduction

Migrates into southern Texas from Mexico; may be introduced to other areas through the movement of infested fruit (Aluja 1994; Thomas 2004)

Impact

Larvae attack at least 60 varieties of fruit, particularly citrus and mangoes (Thomas 2004)

Mexican fruit fly

Mexican Fruit Fly

Credit

In grapefruit as well as many other fruits, one female Mexican fruit fly can deposit large numbers of eggs: up to 40 eggs at a time, 100 or more a day, and about 2,000 over her life span - Jack Dykinga, USDA. Agricultural Research Serv

Find more images

Spotlights

  • USDA Asks for Help Protecting Citrus in the Lower Rio Grande Valley

    • Jun 10, 2022
    • USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

    • The U.S. Department of Agriculture‚Äôs Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) needs your help safeguarding Texas citrus from invasive citrus pests and diseases currently threatening livelihoods and agricultural production in the Lower Rio Grande Valley. APHIS employees in Cameron, Hidalgo, Willacy and Zapata counties are working with the Texas Department of Agriculture (TDA) to inspect and survey fruit trees in residential yards and commercial properties for signs of invasive fruit flies and citrus diseases, such as citrus canker and citrus greening. These pests and diseases, if allowed to become established or spread, could devastate grapefruit, sweet and sour orange, key lime, sweet lemon, and other types of fruit production in that area.

Distribution / Maps / Survey Status

Federally Regulated

Videos

Selected Resources

The section below contains highly relevant resources for this species, organized by source.

Partnership
Federal Government
State and Local Government
Academic
  • EDIS - Mexican Fruit Fly

    • University of Florida.¬†Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Extension.

    • Electronic Data Information Source Publication #ENY201

Professional
Citations