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Thousand Cankers Black Walnut Disease Resources

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University of Georgia. Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health.
Provides state, county, point and GIS data. Maps can be downloaded and shared.
Kansas State University. Kansas Forest Service.
European and Mediterranean Plant Protection Organization.

National Plant Diagnostic Network.

You can become a more effective First Detector by familiarizing yourself with invasive target pests and pathogens known to exist in the U.S. If you think you have encountered one of the species or disease complexes listed, report its presence.

USDA. FS. Northern Research Station.

Nature Conservancy. Don't Move Firewood.
Ontario's Invading Species Awareness Program (Canada).
Missouri Department of Conservation.
See also: For more information about Invasive Tree Pests (insects and diseases) that are not native to Missouri
University of Georgia. Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health.

North Central Integrated Pest Management Center.

See also: Pest Alerts for more resources

USDA. FS. Northeastern Area State and Private Forestry.

North American Plant Protection Organization.

Minnesota Department of Agriculture.

USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.
Kansas Department of Agriculture.
Thousand Cankers poses a serious threat to the health of black walnut trees. The Kansas Department of Agriculture, Kansas Forest Service and K-State Research and Extension need your help to help stop the introduction, and to limit the spread, of this disease in Kansas. We are deeply concerned that if it reaches the native range of black walnuts in central and eastern Kansas, we may lose this tree in our urban and native forests.

Indiana Department of Natural Resources. Entomology and Plant Pathology.