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Spotted Lanternfly

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Spotted lanternfly
Scientific Name:
Lycorma delicatula (White) (Barringer et al. 2015)
Common Name:
Spotted lanternfly (SLF)
Photo:
Spotted lanternfly, adult - Photo by Lawrence Barringer, Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture

Spotlights

  • Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture.

    Pennsylvania Agriculture Secretary Russell Redding today announced that twelve counties have been added to Pennsylvania's Spotted Lanternfly quarantine zone ahead of the 2020 spring hatch. With this addition, the quarantine (PDF | 506 KB) for this invasive pest is now at 26 counties. The new dozen counties are not completely infested, but rather have a few municipalities with a known infestation (PDF | 803 KB) which led to a quarantine being placed on the entire county out of an abundance of caution. Allegheny, Beaver, Blair, Columbia, Cumberland, Huntingdon, Juniata, Luzerne, Mifflin, Northumberland, Perry, and York have been added to the quarantine for 2020. For more information on Spotted Lanternfly in Pennsylvania, visit https://agriculture.pa.gov/spottedlanternfly.

  • Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station.

    The Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station (CAES) in cooperation with USDA APHIS Plant Protection and Quarantine (PPQ) announce the detection of single live adult spotted lanternfly, Lycoma delicatula, in Southbury, CT. While no other spotted lanternflies were found upon surveying the immediate area, a live insect strongly suggests others may be present within easy transport from somewhere in the region. Additional surveys in the area are planned.

    The spotted lanternfly is an invasive sap-feeding planthopper that was discovered in Berks County, Pennsylvania in 2014. It is native to China, India, and Vietnam. It attacks many hosts and has the potential to severely impact Connecticut’s farm crops, particularly apples, grapes, and hops, as well as a number of tree species like maple. Early detection is important for the protection of Connecticut businesses and agriculture. The public is urged to report potential sightings of this invasive pest to ReportSLF@ct.gov. For more information, see the CAES Pest Alert (PDF | 1.9 MB).

  • Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services.
    The Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (VDACS) established a Spotted Lanternfly Quarantine for Frederick County and the city of Winchester, effective immediately. The purpose of the quarantine is to slow the spread of the spotted lanternfly to uninfested areas of the Commonwealth. Early detection is vital for the management of any newly introduced plant pest. For more information on Spotted Lanternfly in Virginia, see: Plant Industry Services (scroll to SLF section).

    The spotted lanternfly was first detected in Winchester in January 2018. Subsequent surveys conducted by VDACS indicate that the pest has become established in the city of Winchester and spread into Frederick County, just north of Winchester. Prior to the January 2018 detection in Virginia, the only Spotted Lanternfly (SLF) found in the U.S. was in Pennsylvania. Populations are now established in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware and northern Virginia.
  • USDA. Agricultural Research Service.

    A map identifying the areas suitable for establishment of the spotted lanternfly (SLF) in the United States and other countries has been published in the Journal of Economic Entomology by Agricultural Research Service scientists. The SLF, originally from China, has spread to Korea and Japan, and has been found most recently in the United States in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Virginia and Delaware. These insects are pests of many agricultural crops including almonds, apples, blueberries, cherries, peaches, grapes and hops as well as hardwoods such as oak, walnut and poplar, among others. USDA and State partners have been working to contain SLF populations since 2014. There is the potential for far reaching economic damage if the SLF becomes widely established in the United States.

  • Maryland Department of Natural Resources.

    Spotted lanternfly is a threat to Maryland and the U.S. The Maryland Department of Agriculture issued a quarantine October 28, 2019 in an effort to contain the invasive species in Cecil and Harford counties after the spotted lanternfly was spotted in Cecil’s northeastern corner and along Harford’s northern border. See additional resources on the Maryland Department of Agriculture's site for Spotted Lanternfly for up-to-date information.

    For questions related to the quarantine, permitting, treatment, or to report a sighting of the spotted lanternfly, especially outside of the quarantine zone, call 410-841-5920 or email DontBug.MD@maryland.gov. If you report a spotted lanternfly via email, please provide the location of the sighting and your contact information.

  • Massachusetts Department of Agricultural Resources.
    The Massachusetts Department of Agricultural Resources (MDAR) announced today that a single dead specimen of the invasive pest known as spotted lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula) was reported and confirmed at a private residence in Boston. As a result, MDAR is urging the public to check for signs of spotted lanternfly adults in any potted plants that they may have received over the holiday season and to report any potential sightings of this pest on MDAR's online reporting form by taking photographs and collecting a specimen if possible. Residents should look for large, gray insects, about one inch long, with black spots and red underwings.
Native To:
Date of U.S. Introduction:
First detected in 2014, but appeared to have been present in the U.S. for 2-3 years (Dara et al. 2015; Barringer et al. 2015)
Means of Introduction:
Possible pathways include imported woody plants, wood products, and other commodities (EPPO 2016)
Impact:
Poses a serious economic threat to multiple U.S. industries, including viticulture, fruit trees, ornamentals and timber (Urban et al.)

Distribution/Maps/Survey Status

Quarantine

Images

Videos

Selected Resources

The section below contains highly relevant resources for this species, organized by source. Or, to display all related content view all resources for Spotted Lanternfly.

Partnership

USDA. APHIS. PPQ. CPHST. Identification Technology Program.

Native to Asia, the spotted lanternfly has quickly spread since its initial detection in 2014. The insect is not a strong flier, yet its U.S. range is expanding, mostly due to the movement of vehicles, outdoor furniture, or other objects to which females glue their inconspicuous egg masses. Includes ID aids to help identify the spotted lanternfly in all its life stages, from egg mass through adult.

European and Mediterranean Plant Protection Organization.

Massachusetts Introduced Pests Outreach Project.

National Plant Diagnostic Network.

You can become a more effective First Detector by familiarizing yourself with invasive target pests and pathogens known to exist in the U.S. If you think you have encountered one of the species or disease complexes listed, report its presence.

Invasive Species Centre (Ontario); Great Lakes Forest Alliance.

Nature Conservancy. Don't Move Firewood.

North Central Integrated Pest Management Center.

See also: Pest Alerts for more resources

New York Invasive Species Clearinghouse.

Michigan State University. Midwest Invasive Species Information Network.

Federal Government

USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.
USDAAPHIS. Plant Protection and Quarantine.
Provides detection history, images and videos, environmental assessments, state plant regulatory official letters, state information (where quarantined), and news and resources.

International Government

Canadian Food Inspection Agency.

State and Local Government

New York Department of Environmental Conservation.

Minnesota Department of Agriculture.

Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station.

See also: Pest Alerts for more resources

North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. Plant Industry Division. Plant Protection Section.

See also: Hot Pest Topics for more resources
Delaware Department of Agriculture.
Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture.
Maryland Department of Agriculture.

Academic

Cornell University. New York State Integrated Pest Management Program.

See also: Invasive Species & Exotic Pests for more factsheets

University of Massachusetts Extension. Landscape, Nursery, and Urban Forestry Program.
University of Maryland Extension. Home and Garden Information Center.

Rutgers University. New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station.

In the U.S., spotted lanternfly is an invasive species that could be very devastating to some New Jersey crops and hardwood trees. In 2018, SLF populations were found in New Jersey and a state quarantine encompassing 3 counties has been established by the NJ Department of Agriculture. People and businesses travelling in and out of Mercer, Hunterdon, and Warren counties should inspect their vehicles for hitchhiking SLF as well as inspect outdoor items such as firewood, paving stones, lawn equipment, etc. for egg masses (see checklist (PDF | 222 KB)). Quarantine compliance will reduce the spread of SLF to new areas and counties thereby protecting New Jersey resources including forests and agriculture. To help survey efforts, please report sightings (with photograph) to slanternfly@njaes.rutgers.edu.
Pennsylvania State University. Cooperative Extension.

Virginia Tech; Virginia State University. Virginia Cooperative Extension.

Report a suspect Spotted Lanternfly. Enables Extension professional to collect information.

Citations