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Quagga Mussel

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Quagga mussel
Scientific Name:
Dreissena rostriformis bugensis (Andrusov, 1897); formerly known as Dreissena bugensis (CABI)
Common Name:
Quagga Mussel
Photo:
Quagga mussel, adult - Photo by Amy Benson; U.S. Geological Survey

Spotlights

  • DOI. Bureau of Reclamation.

    The Bureau of Reclamation has launched a new prize competition seeking innovative solutions for the 100-percent eradication of invasive quagga and zebra mussels from large reservoirs, lakes and rivers in a cost-effective and environmentally sound manner. Invasive mussel infestations pose significant logistical and economic challenges for local communities, recreationists, and water managers by potentially disrupting water deliveries, increasing facility maintenance cost, and impacting the local ecology.

  • Great Lakes Commission; Invasive Mussel Collaborative.
    The Invasive Mussel Collaborative announced today that it has released a new strategy to reduce invasive mussels and their negative impacts. The Strategy to Advance Management of Invasive Zebra and Quagga Mussels is intended to drive investments, policy, and research around invasive mussels across the Great Lakes region and beyond. Since their initial discovery in 1989, zebra and quagga mussels have had dramatic impacts on the Great Lakes ecosystem and economy, including changes to the food web, degrading fish habitat, interfering with drinking water systems and damaging tourism and recreation economies. Today, these mussels continue to spread to new water bodies across the U.S. and Canada.
Native To:
Dnieper River drainage of Ukraine (NAS Database)
Date of U.S. Introduction:
First discovered in 1989 (NAS Database)
Means of Introduction:
Ballast water (NAS Database)
Impact:
Alters food web by filtering water and removing plankton; clogs water-intake pipes (NAS Database)

Distribution/Maps/Survey Status

Images

Videos

Selected Resources

The section below contains selected highly relevant resources for this species, organized by source. To view all related content for this species, click on "View all resources for species" in the top left of this page.

Council or Task Force

Alberta Invasive Species Council (Canada).
See also: Fact Sheets for more information about individual invasive species, including those listed as "Prohibited Noxious" and "Noxious" under the Alberta Weed Control Act
Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office. Washington Invasive Species Council.
Aquatic Nuisance Species Task Force.

Partnership

IUCN. Species Survival Commission. Invasive Species Specialist Group.
Ontario's Invading Species Awareness Program (Canada).
DOI. U.S. Geological Survey; Great Lakes Commission; DOC. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; Great Lakes Fishery Commission.
Northeast Aquatic Nuisance Species Panel.

Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, Galveston Bay Estuary Program; Houston Advanced Research Center (HARC).

Texas State University System. Texas Invasive Species Institute.
100th Meridian Initiative.

Federal Government

Smithsonian Institution. Smithsonian Environmental Research Center. Marine Invasions Research Lab.
DOI. USGS. Wetland and Aquatic Research Center.
Provides distribution maps and collection information (State and County).

State and Local Government

Arizona Game and Fish Department.
See also: Aquatic Invasive Species for additional risk analyses and related species information
Utah Wildlife Division of Wildlife Resources.
California Department of Fish and Game.

Academic

Pennsylvania State University. Pennsylvania Sea Grant.
See also: Aquatic Invasive Species: Resources for additional species information
University of Wisconsin Sea Grant Institute.
Paul Smith's College (New York). Adirondack Watershed Institute.
University of California - Riverside. Center for Invasive Species Research.
Michigan Sea Grant College Program.
University of Minnesota. Minnesota Sea Grant.
Ohio Sea Grant College Program.
Provides information also for Quagga mussel

Professional

Tip of the Mitt Watershed Council (Michigan).

Citations