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Emerald Ash Borer

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Emerald Ash Borer
Scientific Name:
Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, 1888 (ITIS)
Common Name:
Emerald ash borer (EAB)
Photo:
Emerald Ash Borer, Adult - David Cappaert

Spotlights

Native To:
Eastern Russia, Northern China, Japan, and Korea (McCullough and Usborne 2015)
Date of U.S. Introduction:
Means of Introduction:
Arrived accidentally in cargo imported from Asia (McCullough and Usborne 2015)
Impact:
Ash trees lose most of their canopy within 2 years of infestation and die within 3-4 years (McCullough and Usborne 2015; Poland and McCullough 2006)

Distribution/Maps/Survey Status

Quarantine

Images

Videos

Selected Resources

The section below contains selected highly relevant resources for this species, organized by source. To view all related content for this species, click on "View all resources for species" in the top left of this page.

Council or Task Force

Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office. Washington Invasive Species Council.

Partnership

Emerald Ash Borer Information Network.

European and Mediterranean Plant Protection Organization.

Massachusetts Introduced Pests Outreach Project.
IUCN. Species Survival Commission. Invasive Species Specialist Group.
Ontario's Invading Species Awareness Program (Canada).

New York Invasive Species Clearinghouse.

Emerald ash borer was first confirmed in New York in June 2009 near Randolph, in western Cattaraugus County. The rapid spread of the beetle through North America is most likely due to the transport of infested firewood, ash nursery stock, unprocessed ash logs, and other ash products. In an effort to slow the continued spread of EAB, both Federal and New York State agencies have instituted quarantines of infested areas to regulate the transport of ash products.

Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, Galveston Bay Estuary Program; Houston Advanced Research Center (HARC).

Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection.

Federal Government

USDA. FS. Northern Research Station.
USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

USDA. FS. Northeastern Area State and Private Forestry.

USDA. APHIS. Plant Protection and Quarantine.

International Government

Natural Resources Canada. Canadian Forest Service.
Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry (Canada).
Natural Resources Canada. Canadian Forest Service.
Canadian Food Inspection Agency.

State and Local Government

Colorado Department of Agriculture. Division of Plant Industry.
Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) was found in Boulder, CO, in September 2013. As a non-native insect, EAB lacks predators to keep it in check. EAB only attacks ash trees in the genus Fraxinus (so mountain ash are not susceptible). EAB is responsible for the death of millions of ash trees in the Midwest. Help protect Colorado's ash trees! Don't move firewood, and consider chemical treatments to protect high-value ash trees.
Illinois Department of Agriculture. Bureau of Environmental Programs. Division of Natural Resources.
Native to Asia, the Emerald Ash Borer is an exotic beetle that was unknown in North America until June 2002 when it was discovered as the cause for the decline of many ash trees in southeast Michigan and neighboring Windsor, Ontario, Canada. It has since been found in several states from the east coast spanning across the midwest and in June 2006, we discovered that it had taken up residence in Illinois.
Maryland Department of Agriculture.
Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development.
North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. North Carolina Forest Service.
The emerald ash borer is a metallic green beetle that bores into ash trees feeding on tissues beneath the bark, ultimately killing the tree. It is not native to the United States and was first found in the U.S. near Detroit, Michigan in 2002. In 2013, the emerald ash borer was found in Granville, Person, Vance, and Warren counties in North Carolina. In 2015 it was found in many additional counties, and a statewide EAB quarantine went into effect in North Carolina.
Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station.
See also: Publications - All CAES Factsheets for more resources
Missouri Department of Conservation.
See also: For more information about Invasive Tree Pests (insects and diseases) that are not native to Missouri

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

Maryland Department of Natural Resources. Forest Service.
See also: Includes Invasive Plants and Insects Fact Sheets for additional species to help control invasive species in Maryland

Minnesota Department of Agriculture.

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation.

New Jersey Department of Agriculture.

Emerald Ash Borer was discovered in New Jersey in May 2014 in Somerset County, and as of October 2015 has also been found in Bergen, Burlington, Essex, Hunterdon, Mercer, Middlesex, and Monmouth counties. Infestations throughout the U.S. and Canada have killed tens of millions of ash trees since 2002. Report signs of the beetle to the Department of Agriculture at 609-406-6939.

Indiana Department of Natural Resources. Entomology and Plant Pathology.

Academic

Nebraska Forest Service.
The Nebraska Department of Agriculture (NDA) has confirmed that emerald ash borer (EAB) was discovered during a site inspection in Omaha's Pulaski Park on June 6, 2016. Nebraska becomes the 27th state to confirm the presence of EAB, joining neighboring states of Iowa, Missouri, Kansas and Colorado. NDA has issued a quarantine prohibiting ash nursery stock from leaving the quarantine area. The quarantine also regulates the movement of hardwood firewood and mulch, ash timber products and green waste material out of Douglas, Sarpy, Cass, Washington and Dodge counties to assist in the prevention of human-assisted spread of the pest into un-infested areas.
University of Minnesota.
IPM of Midwest Landscapes is available for educating growers, landscapers, managers, and consumers in the principles of IPM and its application to managing the over 150 common insect species in Midwest landscapes.
Kansas State University. Kansas Forest Service.
Michigan Technological University. Forest Resources and Environmental Sciences. Center for Exotic Species.
Purdue University Extension (Indiana).
Use this website to find out where in Indiana the emerald ash borer (EAB) is located, how to combat this invasive pest, and what you can do to preserve ash trees in Indiana. To report a find of EAB in Indiana, call Indiana DNR toll-free 1-866-NO-EXOTIC.
Pennsylvania State University. Cooperative Extension.

Michigan State University. Integrated Pest Management Program.

See also: IPM Scouting in Woody Landscape Plants for more pests and diseases

University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture. Entomology.
Officials with the Office of the State Entomologist in the University of Kentucky Entomology Department on May 22, 2009 announced two confirmed occurrences in Kentucky of emerald ash borer, an invasive insect pest of ash trees. These are the first findings of this destructive insect in the state.
Iowa State University. Extension and Outreach.
University of Missouri Extension.
Emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) is an exotic, invasive, wood-boring insect that infests and kills native North American ash trees, both in forests and landscape plantings. With EAB now in several areas of the Show-Me State - and its ability to hitchhike on firewood - the probability of it spreading to noninfected areas in the state is high.

Professional

College of Menominee Nation Sustainable Development Institute.
Note: EAB impacts on American Indian Communities

Citations