An official website of the United States government

The .gov means it’s official.
Federal government websites always use a .gov or .mil domain. Before sharing sensitive information online, make sure you’re on a .gov or .mil site by inspecting your browser’s address (or “location”) bar.

This site is also protected by an SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) certificate that’s been signed by the U.S. government. The https:// means all transmitted data is encrypted  — in other words, any information or browsing history that you provide is transmitted securely.

You are here Back to top

Emerald Ash Borer Resources

Displaying 1 to 20 of 79

Help
Tennessee Department of Agriculture.
Three Tennessee counties have been quarantined for Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) after detection of the forest-devastating insect, bringing the total number of Tennessee counties under a state and federal EAB quarantine to 62. Cheatham, Giles, and Maury counties have been added to the list of areas restricted for the movement of firewood, ash nursery stock, ash timber, and other material that can spread EAB. The tree-killing beetle was recently found in these three counties through the United States Department of Agriculture’s EAB detection program.
USDA. Agricultural Research Service.
Emerald ash borer (EAB) is an invasive insect from Asia that kills ash trees. EAB was first detected in North America in 2002. Several tiny wasp species are helping to control EAB.
USDA. FS. Northern Research Station.
Select the non-indigenous forest pest to view maps depicting state and county distribution. Produced by: USDA, FS, Forest Health Protection, and its partners.
Delaware Department of Agriculture.
A destructive, invasive beetle that kills ash trees, the emerald ash borer (EAB), has been confirmed in Delaware, making it the 28th state to have found the insect, the Delaware Department of Agriculture announced today. Delaware will be added to a federal quarantine already in 27 other states restricting the interstate shipment of all ash wood and wood products - ash nursery stock, green lumber, waste, compost and chips - as well as hardwood firewood of all species.
Kansas State University. Kansas Forest Service.
Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food, and Forestry. Oklahoma Forestry Services.
With the quarantine of ash trees in Arkansas, the threat of the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) to millions of Oklahoma ash trees intensifies for southeastern Oklahoma, especially McCurtain and Le Flore counties. As the pest is literally next door, Oklahoma Forestry Services is asking Oklahomans to help prevent the infestation spread and be on the lookout and report any signs that the insect is in the state. Please notify Oklahoma Forestry Services at 405-522-6158 if you see signs of EAB infestation in ash trees. For more information about the Emerald Ash Borer visit www.forestry.ok.gov/tree-pest-alerts.

U.S. Government Printing Office. Electronic Code of Federal Regulations.

Vermont Agency of Natural Resources. Department of Forestry, Parks, and Recreation.
Firewood is widely recognized as a major source of non-native forest insect and disease infestations. A rule governing the importation of untreated firewood into Vermont went into effect on May 1, 2016. Visitors to Vermont State Parks, Vermont State Forests, and the Green Mountain National Forest may only bring firewood originating from Vermont or that is heat treated and in its original, labeled package. To help slow the spread of emerald ash borer within Vermont, ash firewood that has not been heat treated should not be moved outside of the Emerald Ash Borer Infested Area in Vermont.
Natural Resources Canada. Canadian Forest Service.
Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry (Canada).
Colorado Department of Agriculture. Division of Plant Industry.
Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) was found in Boulder, CO, in September 2013. As a non-native insect, EAB lacks predators to keep it in check. EAB only attacks ash trees in the genus Fraxinus (so mountain ash are not susceptible). EAB is responsible for the death of millions of ash trees in the Midwest. Help protect Colorado's ash trees! Don't move firewood, and consider chemical treatments to protect high-value ash trees.
Illinois Department of Agriculture. Bureau of Environmental Programs. Division of Natural Resources.
Native to Asia, the Emerald Ash Borer is an exotic beetle that was unknown in North America until June 2002 when it was discovered as the cause for the decline of many ash trees in southeast Michigan and neighboring Windsor, Ontario, Canada. It has since been found in several states from the east coast spanning across the midwest and in June 2006, we discovered that it had taken up residence in Illinois.
Maryland Department of Agriculture.
Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development.
Michigan Technological University. Forest Resources and Environmental Sciences. Center for Exotic Species.
Iowa State University. Extension and Outreach. Pesticide Safety Information Program.
The emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis, is an exotic insect pest from Asia. The flattened, creamy white larval stage feeds below the bark and cuts off the living, water and nutrient conducting vessels causing tree death. EAB has been found in 13 Iowa counties (Allamakee, Black Hawk, Boone, Bremer, Cedar, Des Moines, Henry, Jasper, Jefferson, Muscatine, Story, Union, and Wapello). As of February 2014, all 99 counties in Iowa have been quarantined (Treatment Map) by the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship to slow the movement of this destructive pest to non-quarantined areas/states.

Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources.

The emerald ash borer is a half-inch long metallic green beetle with the scientific name Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire. Larvae of this beetle feed under the bark of ash trees. Their feeding eventually girdles and kills branches and entire trees. Emerald ash borer was first identified in North America in southeastern Michigan in 2002.

USDA. APHIS. Plant Protection and Quarantine.
Wyoming State Forestry Division.
Emerald ash borer (EAB) was confirmed in Boulder County, Colorado in September 2013. This marks the first time EAB has been detected in Colorado as well as the first detection of EAB in any western state. EAB has not been detected in Wyoming. See Forest Health Management for related EAB information.
South Dakota Department of Agriculture.
The South Dakota Department of Agriculture (SDDA) has confirmed that an infestation of emerald ash borer (EAB) has been discovered in northern Sioux Falls. This is the first confirmed infestation in South Dakota. Emerald ash borer is an invasive insect that has killed tens of millions of ash trees in at least 32 states. On May 9, 2018, Secretary Mike Jaspers implemented an Emergency Plant Pest Quarantine in order to prevent or reduce the spread of the EAB. This emergency quarantine is effective immediately. For more information, see the Emerald Ash Borer in South Dakota website.