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Canada

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Spotlights

USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) have developed a protocol to help ensure bilateral trade will continue if African swine fever (ASF) is detected in feral swine in either country, while still absent from domestic swine. The intent of the protocol is to protect swine populations in both countries during an outbreak of ASF in feral swine, while minimizing impacts on the trade of live swine, swine products, and other swine commodities.

Transport Canada.

Canada's coasts and waterways are vital to our environment, livelihoods, and economy, and must be protected. Ballast water, which helps keep vessels stable in the water, can accidentally introduce and spread aquatic invasive species, like the zebra mussel, if released in the water untreated. To further protect Canadian waters, the Government of Canada is taking action to limit the introduction and spread of aquatic invasive species in ballast water. Today, the Canadian Minister of Transport announced the coming into force of the new Ballast Water Regulations to strengthen existing rules for vessels on international voyages and the introduction of new rules for vessels which remain in Canada and on the Great Lakes. These regulations, which replace the Ballast Water Control and Management Regulations, apply to vessels in Canadian waters and to Canadian vessels anywhere in the world. Vessels are now required to:

  • plan their ballast water management and reduce the number of organisms in their ballast water, typically by installing a ballast water management system; and
  • carry a valid certificate, keep records, and be regularly surveyed and inspected. Smaller vessels may follow an equivalent approach tailored to their operations and size.

For more information, see Managing Ballast Water and Backgrounder: Ballast Water Regulations.

Michigan Department of Natural Resources.

For landscapes plagued by autumn olive or entangled in oriental bittersweet, a new website offers help identifying and managing woody invasive plants like these. WoodyInvasives.org, developed by the Woody Invasives of the Great Lakes Collaborative, contains a wealth of information about how to distinguish woody invasive species from similar beneficial plants, an interactive map showing how these species are regulated by Great Lakes jurisdictions, detailed management approaches and noninvasive woody plant ideas for gardeners and landscape designers. "We developed the WIGL Collaborative website to help people learn to identify the woody invasive plants around them and to feel empowered to start controlling them on their properties or in their favorite green places," said Clair Ryan, coordinator of the Midwest Invasive Plant Network, the organization leading the effort.

Government of British Columbia. Ministry of Agriculture.

Three Asian Hornets (Vespa mandarinia) were found in the Nanaimo area on Vancouver Island in mid-August. The identification has been confirmed by Canadian and international experts. This is the first time this insect has been found in British Columbia. Please report suspected Asian giant hornet sightings to the Invasive Species Council of British Columbia.

Pet Industry Joint Advisory Council of Canada; Environment Canada.

Welcome to Habitattitude, a web site dedicated to invasive alien species for aquarium hobbyists, backyard pond owners, water gardeners and others who are concerned about conserving our natural aquatic environment. Introduction and spread of harmful plants and animals in our waterways as a result of these activities, is a growing concern. While most aquatic invasive species do not survive when released into the environment, some may, and if left unchecked, can cause irreversible damage to the environment by degrading our aquatic resources and making waters unusable for recreation. If you are an aquarium hobbyist or enjoy backyard pond and water gardening, you can learn more on this website.

Canadian Food Inspection Agency.

The emerald ash borer (EAB) is a highly destructive invasive beetle which attacks and kills all species of ash, but not mountain ash, which in spite of its name, is a completely different species of tree. To help prevent the spread of EAB, the movement of ash logs and firewood out of regulated areas is restricted. Report any detections outside of regulated areas to one of the CFIA's offices.

Selected Resources

The section below contains highly relevant resources for this subject, organized by source. Or, to display all related content view all resources for Canada

Council or Task Force
Alberta Invasive Species Council.
See also: Invasive Plant Mapping with EDDMapS Alberta

Canadian Council on Invasive Species.

The Canadian Council on Invasive Species (CCIS) serves as a national voice and hub to protect Canada from the impacts of invasive species. With members and chapters from all corners of Canada, along with governments and businesses, the CCIS brings people together to build practical solutions to prevent the spread of invasive species.

Invasive Species Council of Manitoba.

Invasive Species Council of British Columbia.

Ontario Invasive Plant Council.

Yukon Invasive Species Council.

Partnership
Nature Conservancy. iMapInvasives.
i is an invasive species reporting and data management tool that is on-line and map-based. The primary focus for iMapInvasives is to track invasive species locations and management efforts. iMapInvasives tools can be used by citizen scientists, land owners, natural resources managers, and others who are working to prevent, control, or manage invasive species.
See also: The iMapInvasives Network is comprised of organizations that host the iMapInvasives Network database in their respective state or province.
University of Alaska - Anchorage. Alaska Center for Conservation Science.
Nature Conservancy. Don't Move Firewood.
Provides specific state information on their firewood regulations and recommendations (includes Canada and Mexico).

Ontario Federation of Anglers and Hunters.

Canadian Wildlife Federation; Environment and Climate Change Canada. Hinterland Who's Who.

Manitoba Purple Loosestrife Project.

NatureServe.

This searchable directory includes contact information and self-identified areas of individual expertise for NatureServe, NatureServe Canada, and our Network Programs in the United States, Canada, and Latin America. More than 80 NatureServe Network Programs collect and analyze data about the plants, animals, and ecologi­cal communities of the Western Hemisphere. They are the leading source of information on the precise locations and conditions of at-risk species and threatened ecosystems in their jurisdictions. NatureServe collects, curates, and distributes that information for use at regional, national, and international scales. Staff throughout the Network are experts in their fields, and include some of the most knowledgeable field biologists and conservation planners in their regions.
Great Lakes Commission.

Midwest Invasive Plant Network; Great Lakes Restoration Initiative.

The Woody Invasives of the Great Lakes Collaborative provides information related to woody invasive species identification, distribution, impacts, regulatory status, and control and management. The collaborative has also developed recommendations on trees, shrubs and vines that gardeners and landowners can plant as alternatives to known woody invasives. The WIGL Collaborative was founded in early 2018 and is coordinated by the staff of the Midwest Invasive Plant Network (MIPN).

International Government

Fisheries and Oceans Canada.

Government of Saskatchewan.
Natural Resources Canada. Canadian Forest Service.

Government of British Columbia.

Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources.
British Columbia Ministry of Agriculture.

Canadian Food Inspection Agency.

Academic

University of Texas - Austin. Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

Provides lists of native plants recommended for various purposes (by State or Canadian Province). Once you have selected a collection, you can browse the collection or search within it using the combination search. Also provides other special collections resources.

See also: Native Plant Database to explore the wealth of native plants in North America. Use the options below to search for 25,169 native plants by scientific or common name or choose a particular family of plants.

Brock University (Canada).

The Niagara Region’s Aquatic and Riparian Invasive Species Control Database (created by Lyn A. Brown as part of a Master of Sustainability thesis at Brock University) provides a baseline for the 2017/18 state of aquatic and riparian invasive management activities in the Niagara Region of Ontario. An interactive GIS map uses the database information to show where those control efforts are occurring, and users can filter points on the map by invasive species, control type, control effectiveness, or organization.

Professional

Okanagan Basin Water Board (Canada). Okanagan Water Wise.

Garry Oak Ecosystems Recovery Team (Canada).

ClearSeas Centre for Responsible Marine Shipping.

Invasive Species Centre (Ontario).

Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies.
Provides lists of sites for governmental members (U.S. state and territorial fish and wildlife agencies), North American members, affiliate members, and contributing members.

North American Native Plant Society.

Local Native Plant Societies are often your best source of information about plants native to your area.
Note: Provides information for State and Canadian Provinces.

Native Plant Society of Saskatchewan (Canada).