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Canada

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Spotlights

  • Canadian Food Inspection Agency.
    Collaboration between Canadian governments, industry, academia and other partners in plant health is essential to protect our resources from new and emerging risks, drive innovation and ensure that Canadian industry remains competitive and sustainable. Plant health partners in Canada are pleased to announce the establishment of the Canadian Plant Health Council – fulfilling a multi-partner commitment to collaboratively implement the Plant and Animal Health Strategy for Canada. The Canadian Plant Health Council will address priorities for the plant health sector, working together on preventive approaches and activities to protect forests, agriculture and other plants from pests, diseases and other risks.
  • Canadian Food Inspection Agency.
    The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) has confirmed the presence of Whirling Disease in fish in Johnson Lake in Banff National Park. This is the first case of whirling disease in Canada. The federal and provincial governments will work together to develop an appropriate response plan as additional information about the disease situation is confirmed.
  • Fisheries and Oceans Canada.
    The Government of Canada is investing up to $20 million over five years, and ongoing, to Canada's Asian Carp Program to continue prevention efforts through early warning surveillance, partnering and outreach activities. This funding will allow Fisheries and Oceans Canada to expand the Asian Carp Program to increase protection of our Great Lakes and preserve our fisheries.
  • Canadian Food Inspection Agency.
    The emerald ash borer (EAB) is a highly destructive invasive beetle which attacks and kills all species of ash, but not mountain ash, which in spite of its name, is a completely different species of tree. To help prevent the spread of EAB, the movement of ash logs and firewood out of regulated areas is restricted. Report any detections outside of regulated areas to one of the CFIA's offices.

Selected Resources

The section below contains selected highly relevant resources for this locaton, organized by source. To view all related content for this location, click on "View all resources for location" in the top left of this page.

Council or Task Force

Alberta Invasive Species Council.
See also: Invasive Plant Mapping with EDDMapS Alberta
Invasive Species Council of Manitoba.

Invasive Species Council of British Columbia.

Ontario Invasive Plant Council.

Yukon Invasive Species Council.

Partnership

Nature Conservancy. iMapInvasives.
i is an invasive species reporting and data management tool that is on-line and map-based. The primary focus for iMapInvasives is to track invasive species locations and management efforts. iMapInvasives tools can be used by citizen scientists, land owners, natural resources managers, and others who are working to prevent, control, or manage invasive species.
See also: The iMapInvasives Network is comprised of organizations that host the iMapInvasives Network database in their respective state or province.
University of Alaska - Anchorage. Alaska Center for Conservation Science.
Nature Conservancy. Don't Move Firewood.
Provides specific state information on their firewood regulations and recommendations (includes Canada and Mexico).
USDA. Agricultural Research Service; University of Montana-Missoula.
Provides a searchable database of the noxious weed lists for all U.S. states and six southern provinces of Canada. The database can be searched by plant name, state name, or by clicking on a map.
Ontario Federation of Anglers and Hunters.
Canadian Wildlife Federation; Environment and Climate Change Canada. Hinterland Who's Who.
Manitoba Purple Loosestrife Project.
NatureServe.
This searchable directory includes contact information and self-identified areas of individual expertise for NatureServe, NatureServe Canada, and our Network Programs in the United States, Canada, and Latin America. More than 80 NatureServe Network Programs collect and analyze data about the plants, animals, and ecologi­cal communities of the Western Hemisphere. They are the leading source of information on the precise locations and conditions of at-risk species and threatened ecosystems in their jurisdictions. NatureServe collects, curates, and distributes that information for use at regional, national, and international scales. Staff throughout the Network are experts in their fields, and include some of the most knowledgeable field biologists and conservation planners in their regions.
Great Lakes Commission.

International Government

Fisheries and Oceans Canada.
Government of Saskatchewan.
Natural Resources Canada. Canadian Forest Service.
British Columbia Ministry of Forests, Lands, and Natural Resource Operations. Resource Practices Branch.
British Columbia Ministry of Agriculture.
Canadian Food Inspection Agency.
Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources.

Academic

University of Texas - Austin. Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.
Provides lists of native plants recommended for various purposes (by State or Canadian Province). Once you have selected a collection, you can browse the collection or search within it using the combination search. Also provides other special collections resources.

Professional

Okanagan Basin Water Board (Canada). Okanagan Water Wise.

Hamilton Conservation Authority (Canada).
Garry Oak Ecosystems Recovery Team (Canada).
ClearSeas Centre for Responsible Marine Shipping.

Invasive Species Centre (Ontario).

North American Native Plant Society.
Local Native Plant Societies are often your best source of information about plants native to your area.
Note: Provides information for State and Canadian Provinces.