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North America

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Spotlights

  • Government of Saskatchewan.

    Today, Environment Minister Dustin Duncan introduced the Government of Saskatchewan’s new Aquatic Invasive Species Strategy during an address to the Saskatchewan Wildlife Federation’s (SWF) annual convention in Weyburn. The new framework is designed to help the province prevent, address and manage aquatic invasive species (AIS) threats. The ministry and the SWF are partners on the province’s AIS Task Force – which focuses on additional education and monitoring activities – along with other government agencies, conservation groups, non-government organizations and universities. "This strategy emphasizes the need for collaboration and co-ordination with provincial and federal government agencies, non-government organizations and neighbouring jurisdictions to prevent the introduction and spread of high-risk aquatic invasive species," Duncan said. The province's new AIS Strategy, as well as further information about AIS and fishing, is available online.

  • Government of British Columbia. Ministry of Agriculture.

    Three Asian Hornets (Vespa mandarinia) were found in the Nanaimo area on Vancouver Island in mid-August. The identification has been confirmed by Canadian and international experts. This is the first time this insect has been found in British Columbia. Please report suspected Asian giant hornet sightings to the Invasive Species Council of British Columbia.

  • DOI. Office of Insular Affairs.
    Doug Domenech, U.S. Department of the Interior Assistant Secretary for Insular and International Affairs this week announced $1,488,890 in fiscal year 2018 grants to combat invasive species and protect natural resources in the U.S. Territories of American Samoa, Guam, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, the U.S. Virgin Islands, as well as the freely associated states of the Federated States of Micronesia and the Republic of Palau. "Invasive species in the islands are disruptive for both marine and terrestrial resources in the islands, which already face a delicate balance," said Assistant Secretary Domenech. "Secretary Zinke and I are pleased to help control and eradicate invasive species in the islands in order to protect public health, livelihoods, and fragile environments and economies."
  • Barbados Government Information Service.
    Invasive alien species, such as the Giant African Snail, the Lionfish and rats, are threats and can impact negatively on small island developing states such as those in the Caribbean, which are widely recognized as biodiversity hotspots. Minister of Environment and National Beautification, Trevor Prescod, pointed this out today, as he delivered the feature address at the Regional Inception Workshop for the “Preventing Costs of Invasive Alien Species (IAS) in Barbados and the Organisation of Eastern Caribbean States” Project. The workshop will seek to finalize project work plans and budgets; to approve year one work plans and budgets and to understand the United Nations Environment Programme and Centre for Agriculture and Biosciences International financial rules governing the project execution. It will also seek to understand monitoring and evaluation procedures and targets for the project, towards helping Barbados and other OECS countries manage and combat the adverse effects of IAS.
  • Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew (United Kingdom).
    Kew's UK Overseas Territories (UKOTs) team recently returned from a successful launch of the Tropical Important Plant Areas project in the British Virgin Islands. Tropical Important Plant Areas (TIPAs) are target sites for plant and habitat conservation, identified by the presence of threatened species, threatened habitats and/or high botanical richness. Although TIPAs are not legal designations, they can inform the protection and management of sites for biodiversity conservation.
  • National Geographic.

    When the expansion of the Panama Canal is completed in 2016, giant ships that now must dock at West Coast ports after crossing the Pacific will be able to deliver cargo directly to ports on the Gulf of Mexico and the East Coast. One thing they may be delivering, according to a recent study, is a much larger number of alien species.
  • Pet Industry Joint Advisory Council of Canada; Environment Canada.
    Welcome to Habitattitude, a web site dedicated to invasive alien species for aquarium hobbyists, backyard pond owners, water gardeners and others who are concerned about conserving our natural aquatic environment. Introduction and spread of harmful plants and animals in our waterways as a result of these activities, is a growing concern. While most aquatic invasive species do not survive when released into the environment, some may, and if left unchecked, can cause irreversible damage to the environment by degrading our aquatic resources and making waters unusable for recreation. If you are an aquarium hobbyist or enjoy backyard pond and water gardening, you can learn more on this website.
  • Canadian Food Inspection Agency.

    The emerald ash borer (EAB) is a highly destructive invasive beetle which attacks and kills all species of ash, but not mountain ash, which in spite of its name, is a completely different species of tree. To help prevent the spread of EAB, the movement of ash logs and firewood out of regulated areas is restricted. Report any detections outside of regulated areas to one of the CFIA's offices.

Selected Resources

The section below contains highly relevant resources for this locaton, organized by source. Or, to display all related content view all resources for North America.

Council or Task Force

Alberta Invasive Species Council.
See also: Invasive Plant Mapping with EDDMapS Alberta
Invasive Species Council of Manitoba.

Invasive Species Council of British Columbia.

Ontario Invasive Plant Council.

Yukon Invasive Species Council.

Partnership

Bahamas Ministry of Agriculture, Marine Resources and Local Government; Global Environment Facility.

See also: Documents and Media for more resources

Nature Conservancy. iMapInvasives.
i is an invasive species reporting and data management tool that is on-line and map-based. The primary focus for iMapInvasives is to track invasive species locations and management efforts. iMapInvasives tools can be used by citizen scientists, land owners, natural resources managers, and others who are working to prevent, control, or manage invasive species.
See also: The iMapInvasives Network is comprised of organizations that host the iMapInvasives Network database in their respective state or province.
University of Alaska - Anchorage. Alaska Center for Conservation Science.

Caribbean Invasive Alien Species Network.

Wageningen University & Research (Netherlands); Dutch Caribbean Nature Alliance.
Nature Conservancy. Don't Move Firewood.
Provides specific state information on their firewood regulations and recommendations (includes Canada and Mexico).
Ontario Federation of Anglers and Hunters.

Canadian Wildlife Federation; Environment and Climate Change Canada. Hinterland Who's Who.

Manitoba Purple Loosestrife Project.

NatureServe.

This searchable directory includes contact information and self-identified areas of individual expertise for NatureServe, NatureServe Canada, and our Network Programs in the United States, Canada, and Latin America. More than 80 NatureServe Network Programs collect and analyze data about the plants, animals, and ecologi­cal communities of the Western Hemisphere. They are the leading source of information on the precise locations and conditions of at-risk species and threatened ecosystems in their jurisdictions. NatureServe collects, curates, and distributes that information for use at regional, national, and international scales. Staff throughout the Network are experts in their fields, and include some of the most knowledgeable field biologists and conservation planners in their regions.
Great Lakes Commission.

International Government

CONABIO. Information System on Invasive Species in Mexico.

Prepared by: National Advisory Committee on Invasive Species, Comisión Nacional para el Conocimiento y Uso de la Biodiversidad, Comisión Nacional de Áreas Protegidas, Secretaría de Medio Ambiente y Recursos Naturales. México.

Fisheries and Oceans Canada.

Government of Saskatchewan.
Natural Resources Canada. Canadian Forest Service.

Government of British Columbia.

Cayman Islands Government. Department of Environment.
Bermuda Department of Environment and Natural Resources.
Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources.
United Nations Environment Programme. Caribbean Environment Programme.
British Columbia Ministry of Agriculture.

Canadian Food Inspection Agency.

Jamaica Ministry of Industry, Commerce, Agriculture, and Fisheries.

Comisión Nacional Para el Conocimiento y Uso de la Biodiversidad (National Commission for the Knowledge and Use of Biodiversity, Mexico).

Special Note: In Spanish

Academic

University of Florida.

University of the United States Virgin Islands. Cooperative Extension Service.
University of Texas - Austin. Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.
Provides lists of native plants recommended for various purposes (by State or Canadian Province). Once you have selected a collection, you can browse the collection or search within it using the combination search. Also provides other special collections resources.

Brock University (Canada).

The Niagara Region’s Aquatic and Riparian Invasive Species Control Database (created by Lyn A. Brown as part of a Master of Sustainability thesis at Brock University) provides a baseline for the 2017/18 state of aquatic and riparian invasive management activities in the Niagara Region of Ontario. An interactive GIS map uses the database information to show where those control efforts are occurring, and users can filter points on the map by invasive species, control type, control effectiveness, or organization.

Colegio de Postgraduados en Ciencias Agrícolas. Mexico.
Special Note: In Spanish

Professional

Okanagan Basin Water Board (Canada). Okanagan Water Wise.

Garry Oak Ecosystems Recovery Team (Canada).

ClearSeas Centre for Responsible Marine Shipping.

Invasive Species Centre (Ontario).

Roatan Marine Park (Honduras).

Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies.
Provides lists of sites for governmental members (U.S. state and territorial fish and wildlife agencies), North American members, affiliate members, and contributing members.
North American Native Plant Society.
Local Native Plant Societies are often your best source of information about plants native to your area.
Note: Provides information for State and Canadian Provinces.

Turneffe Atoll Trust (Belize).