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Minnesota

Provides selected Minnesota resources from agencies and organizations with an interest in the prevention, control, or eradication of invasive species.

Spotlights

  • 2021 Research Report - Minnesota Aquatic Invasive Species Research Center

    • Jan 5, 2022
    • University of Minnesota. Minnesota Aquatic Invasive Species Research Center.

    • Over the last year, MAISRC research teams have worked tirelessly in the field, lab, and at their computers to generate and analyze data that is informing evidence-based decisions from the end of your dock to the State Capitol. The incremental steps are making a difference, leading to big wins, and eventually to real-world solutions to aquatic invasive species problems. This year, MAISRC is sharing past year's research highlights in the form of a story map—enjoy an interactive experience, watch project videos, click straight to project pages, and see exactly where research is happening on the map.

  • Minnesota DNR, USFWS Using eDNA to Learn About Invasive Carp

    • Aug 12, 2022
    • Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.

    • The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service have been using environmental DNA (or eDNA) technology to detect invasive carp in the St. Croix, Mississippi and Minnesota rivers. May sampling in the St. Croix River showed silver carp eDNA about four miles north of where invasive carp have been confirmed in the St. Croix. eDNA is DNA released from an organism into the environment that is detectable at very low concentrations.

      Invasive carp captures must be reported to the DNR immediately by calling 651-587-2781 or emailing invasivecarp.dnr@state.mn.us. Take a photo and transport the carp to the nearest DNR fisheries office or make arrangements for it to be picked up by a DNR official. Do not release captured invasive carp. A permit can be requested to keep captured invasive carp for consumption or disposal.

  • Invasive Clam Discovered by Sherburne County Youth

    • Nov 9, 2020
    • University of Minnesota Extension.

    • This past August, a new population of golden clams, Corbicula fluminea, was discovered by twelve-year-old budding conservationist, William Guthrie. The new infestation was found in Briggs Lake (Sherburne County). The discovery of golden clams in Briggs Lake is significant because it is an inland lake with no supplemental heat source. If the clams can survive our winter months, they could also spread and reproduce in additional lakes and rivers. Similar to zebra mussels, infestations of golden clams can clog water intake pipes and alter local ecosystems.

  • How to Report Locations of Invasive Species

    • Minnesota Invasive Species Advisory Council.

    • One of the keys to a rapid response to invasive species is the early identification of new occurrences. Please help report occurrences of invasive species in Minnesota. To report suspicious pest species arriving on plants or articles from foreign countries or other states, please contact the MDA's Report a Pest. To report invasive aquatic plants or wild animals, please contact the DNR Invasive Species Program at: 651-259-5100 (metro) or 1-888-646-6367.

  • Minnesota Forest Pest First Detector Program

    • University of Minnesota Extension.

    • Forest pest first detectors are trained to quickly detect and diagnose early infestations of emerald ash borer, gypsy moth, Asian longhorned beetle, Japanese barberry, Oriental bittersweet and other pests, so that state and federal agencies can control the spread. Become part of the award-winning Minnesota Forest Pest First Detector volunteer program to help the public find new invasive species affecting Minnesota’s trees and forests, or attend as a refresher for those already active as Forest Pest First Detectors.

  • Pesky Plant Trackers

    • University of Minnesota. Department of Forest Resources.

    • Welcome, Volunteers! Pesky Plant Trackers is a citizen science opportunity focused on two non-native plants, wild parsnip and Japanese knotweed. Volunteers use Nature's Notebook to collect important information by observing seasonal changes in leaves, flowers, and fruits.

State Specific Threats

Selected Resources

The section below contains highly relevant resources for this location, organized by source.

Council or Task Force
Partnership
  • Woody Invasives of the Great Lakes Collaborative

    • Midwest Invasive Plant Network; Great Lakes Restoration Initiative.

    • The Woody Invasives of the Great Lakes Collaborative provides information related to woody invasive species identification, distribution, impacts, regulatory status, and control and management. The collaborative has also developed recommendations on trees, shrubs and vines that gardeners and landowners can plant as alternatives to known woody invasives. The WIGL Collaborative was founded in early 2018 and is coordinated by the staff of the Midwest Invasive Plant Network (MIPN).

Federal Government
State and Local Government
Academic