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Minnesota

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Spotlights

  • University of Minnesota Extension.

    This past August, a new population of golden clams, Corbicula fluminea, was discovered by twelve-year-old budding conservationist, William Guthrie. The new infestation was found in Briggs Lake (Sherburne County). The discovery of golden clams in Briggs Lake is significant because it is an inland lake with no supplemental heat source. If the clams can survive our winter months, they could also spread and reproduce in additional lakes and rivers. Similar to zebra mussels, infestations of golden clams can clog water intake pipes and alter local ecosystems.

  • Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.

    The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources is conducting an immediate response to the capture of 51 invasive carp on the Mississippi River. The invasive carp were caught by two commercial fishing operators near La Crosse and Trempealeau, Wisconsin, during routine spring netting last weekend. In response to this discovery, the DNR is working with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the U.S. Geological Survey, the Wisconsin DNR and commercial fishing operators to conduct large-scale netting, studies of the captured carp and increased monitoring. "The location where these fish were caught is commonly netted because of concentrations of commercially valuable fish," said DNR invasive carp field lead Ben Larson. "This is the largest congregation of invasive carp we've seen this far upstream." Invasive carp have been progressing upstream since escaping into the Mississippi River in Arkansas in the 1970s. These large fish compete with native species and pose a threat to rivers and lakes.

    Invasive carp captures must be reported to the DNR immediately. Call 651-587-2781 or email invasivecarp.dnr@state.mn.us. Take a photo and transport the carp to the nearest DNR fisheries office or make arrangements for it to be picked up by a DNR official. More information about invasive carp is available on the Minnesota DNR website.

  • Michigan Department of Natural Resources.

    For landscapes plagued by autumn olive or entangled in oriental bittersweet, a new website offers help identifying and managing woody invasive plants like these. WoodyInvasives.org, developed by the Woody Invasives of the Great Lakes Collaborative, contains a wealth of information about how to distinguish woody invasive species from similar beneficial plants, an interactive map showing how these species are regulated by Great Lakes jurisdictions, detailed management approaches and noninvasive woody plant ideas for gardeners and landscape designers. "We developed the WIGL Collaborative website to help people learn to identify the woody invasive plants around them and to feel empowered to start controlling them on their properties or in their favorite green places," said Clair Ryan, coordinator of the Midwest Invasive Plant Network, the organization leading the effort.

  • Minnesota Invasive Species Advisory Council.

    One of the keys to a rapid response to invasive species is the early identification of new occurrences. Please help report occurrences of invasive species in Minnesota. To report suspicious pest species arriving on plants or articles from foreign countries or other states, please contact the MDA's Arrest the Pest. To report invasive aquatic plants or wild animals, please contact the DNR Invasive Species Program at: 651-259-5100 (metro) or 1-888-646-6367.

  • University of Minnesota. Forest Resources Extension.
    In 2008, the University of Minnesota Extension, the Minnesota Department of Agriculture Plant Protection Division, and the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources Division of Forestry combined efforts and rolled out the Emerald Ash Borer First Detector Program, part of the National Plant Diagnostic Network. Here in Minnesota, we chose to focus on and provide in-depth training for a specific pest, the emerald ash borer, to increase our chances of finding the targeted pest. Since 2008, the training has expanded to include several other pests of national concern.
  • Minnesota Department of Agriculture.
    In September 2016, Palmer amaranth, Amaranthus palmeri, was found in Minnesota. To date, it has been documented in Douglas, Jackson, Lyon, Redwood, Todd, and Yellow Medicine counties. The Minnesota Department of Agriculture (MDA), University of Minnesota Extension, USDA, landowners and other partners are working to eradicate these infestations before they can spread to new areas. Be proactive and prevent Palmer amaranth establishment. Familiarize yourself with Palmer amaranth identification and actively look for it in crop fields, borders, ditches, conservation lands and around dairies. If you suspect Palmer amaranth on your property, immediately call your local U of M Extension Educator or IPM Specialist, crop consultant and/or the MDA’s Arrest the Pest (888-545-6684) to report locations.

State Specific Threats

Selected Resources

The section below contains highly relevant resources for this subject, organized by source. Or, to display all related content view all resources for Minnesota

Council or Task Force

Minnesota Department of Agriculture.

Partnership

Minnesota Department of Natural Resources; USDA. Forest Service.

Interagency partners in Minnesota have launched PlayCleanGo, an education and outreach campaign for outdoor recreationalists. The goal is to encourage outdoor recreation while protecting valuable natural resources. The objective is to slow or stop the spread of terrestrial invasive species (those that occur on land) through changes in public behavior. See how you can take action and stop invasive species in your tracks.

Midwest Invasive Plant Network; Great Lakes Restoration Initiative.

The Woody Invasives of the Great Lakes Collaborative provides information related to woody invasive species identification, distribution, impacts, regulatory status, and control and management. The collaborative has also developed recommendations on trees, shrubs and vines that gardeners and landowners can plant as alternatives to known woody invasives. The WIGL Collaborative was founded in early 2018 and is coordinated by the staff of the Midwest Invasive Plant Network (MIPN).

Federal Government
State and Local Government
Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.

Minnesota Department of Agriculture.

Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.
Academic
University of Minnesota. Minnesota Sea Grant.
University of Minnesota. Forest Resources Extension. My Minnesota Woods.

University of Minnesota. Extension.