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Florida

Provides selected Florida resources from agencies and organizations with an interest in the prevention, control, or eradication of invasive species.

Spotlights

  • FWC, Southwest Florida CISMA Invite the Public to Participate in Freshwater 2022 Invasive Fish Roundup

    • Apr 6, 2022
    • Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.

    • The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) and the Southwest Florida Cooperative Invasive Species Management Area (CISMA) invite the public to participate in the 2022 Invasive Fish Roundup event, targeting freshwater invasive fish species. This event takes place from April 28 through May 1, 2022, with the weigh-in occurring on Sunday, May 1 from noon until 3 p.m. at Bass Pro Shops, 10040 Gulf Center Drive, Fort Myers, Florida 33913. The weigh-in on Sunday, May 1 at Bass Pro Shops is open to the public.

      The roundup is a 3-day event that is open to teams of one to four anglers, fishing from shore or boat in the Southwest Florida CISMA area (Collier, Lee, Charlotte, Hendry and Glades counties) with prizes awarded to the top team in various categories and free giveaway prizes for all participants. The goal of this event is to encourage the public to target invasive species while fishing and to promote awareness of the potential negative impacts of releasing invasive species into Florida’s waterways. This is also an opportunity for Southwest Florida CISMA and the FWC to gather information about invasive fish distribution and abundance, both of which could help with future management of invasive fish species.

  • Fighting the Tegu Spread, Protecting Florida’s Wildlife, Natural Areas Through Sustained Multiagency Effort

    • Nov 2, 2021
    • University of Florida. IFAS Extension.

    • Argentine black and white tegus have spread and established populations in and around Florida at a rapid and growing rate demonstrating critical implications for native wildlife, numerous natural areas, and even restoration efforts for Everglades National Park. UF scientists at the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) and partnering agencies have co-authored the “Growth and Spread of the Argentine Black and White Tegu Population in Florida” illustrating the depth and breadth of the tegu problem. The comprehensive fact sheet details the invasion of the species, the tegu population’s increase, impacts for wildlife and natural areas at stake, interagency goals and efforts to reduce the threat, and the implications of species expansion.

  • Florida FWC Approves Rule Changes to Help Protect Florida from 16 High-Risk Invasive Reptiles

    • Feb 25, 2021
    • Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.

    • At its February 2021 meeting, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) approved staff recommendations to create new rules to address the importation, breeding and possession of high-risk invasive reptiles. The approved rule changes to Chapter 68-5, F.A.C. specifically address Burmese pythons, Argentine black and white tegus, green iguanas and 13 other high-risk nonnative snakes and lizards that pose a threat to Florida’s ecology, economy, and human health and safety. For more information, see New Rules for Invasive Nonnative Reptiles.

  • Florida Eradicates Giant African Land Snail

    • Oct 8, 2021
    • Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services.

    • This week, Florida Agriculture Commissioner Nikki Fried and the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS) Division of Plant Industry (DPI), along with the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), announced the eradication of the giant African land snail (GALS) from Broward and Miami-Dade counties. This eradication announcement marks only the second time this pest has been eradicated in the world, both in South Florida. For the past 11 years, the FDACS Division of Plant Industry has worked toward eradication through multiple rounds of visual surveys and inspections, K-9 detector dog surveys and inspections, manual collection and treatment programs. In total, 168,538 snails were collected from 32 core population areas comprised of thousands of properties.

      The giant African land snail is a highly invasive agricultural pest, known to feed on over 500 varieties of plants. They also pose a risk to humans and animals by carrying rat lung worm, a parasite that can cause meningitis in humans. Both the USDA and DPI will continue to remain vigilant in their commitments to safeguard American agriculture through surveys, early detection, and rapid response. The public should continue to watch for the snails and report suspects to the FDACS-DPI hotline at 1-888-397-1517.

  • Exotic Pet Amnesty Program

    • Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.

    • In an effort to keep unwanted exotic pets out of Florida's native habitats, people can surrender exotic pets free of charge with no questions asked. Every attempt will be made to place all healthy animals with experienced exotic pet adopters.

  • Identify and Report Invasive Animals and Plants in Florida - IveGot1

    • University of Georgia. Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health.

    • IveGot1 is more than just an app, it is an integrated invasive species reporting and outreach campaign for Florida that includes the app, a website with direct access to invasive species reporting and a hotline 1-888-IVEGOT1 for instant reports of live animals. By reporting sightings of invasive animals and plants, Florida agencies can better assess the extent of the infestations and hopefully eradicate new infestations before they become huge problems. The goal of IveGot1 is to make identification and reporting easy and efficient as possible.

  • Join the Air Potato Patrol and Become a Citizen Scientist Today

    • Air Potato Patrol.

    • The Air Potato Patrol is a citizen science project that involves scientists and researchers with the USDA and the State of Florida and of course you — citizens concerned about the effects of invasive species on our economy and environment. We’re looking for volunteers who are willing to go through our training and report data to the researchers on what is happening to the air potato growing on your property. This citizen science project is open to anyone who wants to help and is easy to become involved with.

  • Python Patrol

    • Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.

    • Python Patrol is a no-cost training program that aims to create a network of trained individuals throughout south Florida who know how to identify Burmese pythons, report sightings, and in some cases, capture and humanely kill the snakes. Python Patrol training is offered throughout south and southwest Florida.

State Specific Threats

Selected Resources

The section below contains highly relevant resources for this location, organized by source.

Council or Task Force
  • Florida Invasive Species Council

    • Florida Invasive Species Council.

    • Special Note: In an effort to retire outdated invasive species terminology, the Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council (FLEPPC) formally changed its name to the Florida Invasive Species Council (FISC).

Partnership
  • Everglades Cooperative Invasive Species Management Area

    • Miami-Dade County (Florida); DOD. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers; DOI. National Park Service and Fish and Wildlife Service; Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission; South Florida Water Management District.

  • Florida Invasive Plant Species Mobile Field Guide

    • Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council; Orange County Government; University of South Florida.

    • FLIP (Florida Invasive Plants) is designed to be a mobile field guide that can be accessed by a computer, smart phone, tablet, or other device with internet browser capability. Developed in partnership with the University of South Florida (USF), FLIP currently contains 20 plants: 19 of the 2011 Category I invasive species and one of the 2011 Category II invasive species, as designated by the Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council (FLEPPC).

  • Florida Invasive Species Partnership

    • Florida Invasive Species Partnership.

Federal Government
State and Local Government
Academic