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Reporting

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Spotlights

  • Ohio State University. College of Food, Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.

    Ohio State University Extension has released a new app for spotting and tracking invasive species -- non-native organisms such as Asian carps, purple loosestrife and Asian longhorned beetle -- to try to keep them from setting up beachheads and hurting the economy and environment. By using the free Great Lakes Early Detection Network app, a person can take pictures of suspected invasive species -- whether of farm, forest or water -- and upload the pictures and locations for verification. Based on this early warning, scientists can send out alerts, map the spread and figure out a battle plan.

  • Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office.

    To help combat the $1.3 billion threat invasive species pose to Washington's economy every year, the Washington Invasive Species Council is inviting the public to the frontlines of its work by detecting invasive species and reporting them on its newly improved WA Invasives app. The free app enables anyone to report a plant or animal by collecting photographs, geographic coordinates, and sighting information. Users recreating in the backcountry also can collect data offline, when cellular service isn't available. The app also acts as digital field guide.
  • University of Georgia. Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health.

    The Southeast Early Detection Network (SEEDN) app brings the power of Early Detection and Distribution Mapping System (EDDMapS) to your smartphone. Now you can submit invasive species observations directly with your smartphone from the field. These reports are uploaded to EDDMapS and e-mailed directly to local and state verifiers for review. SEEDN is more than just a smartphone app; it is an integrated invasive species reporting and outreach campaign for the Southeastern United States that includes the app and the EDDMapS website.

  • eXtension.
    You can help with efforts to control invasive species by reporting occurrences of invasive species. The information provided can help you know what information to report and which method of reporting to choose.

Selected Resources

The section below contains selected highly relevant resources for this subject, organized by source. To view all related content for this subject, click on "View all resources for subject" in the top left of this page.

Council or Task Force

Minnesota Invasive Species Advisory Council.

One of the keys to a rapid response to invasive species is the early identification of new occurrences. Please help report occurrences of invasive species in Minnesota. To report suspicious pest species arriving on plants or articles from foreign countries or other states, please contact the MDA's Arrest the Pest. To report invasive aquatic plants or wild animals, please contact the DNR Invasive Species Program at: 651-259-5100 (metro) or 1-888-646-6367.

Oregon Invasive Species Council.

Think you've found an invader? Oregon needs your help. Early detection is critical to keep Oregon protected from new invasives. If we can detect new outbreaks early and act quickly to control them, we save Oregon's natural resources and prevent costly eradication efforts. By the time an invader is easily noticeable and begins to cause damage, it is often too late.

Partnership

University of Hawaii. Pacific Cooperative Studies Unit. Hawaii Biodiversity Information Network.

The Hawaii Early Detection Network was created to increase public awareness of invasive species and engage communities in the monitoring of their own neighborhoods. Find out how you help protect the environment of Hawaii by participating in the Eyes and Ears Team and attending an educational workshop or downloading your own field guide. If you are reporting a snake call 911 or for an animal call 643-PEST immediately!

Portland State University (Oregon).

Whatisthisbug.org (California).

"What is This Bug" was developed from Farm Bill monies after the need for increased citizen help was recognized in the nationwide fight against invasive species. How can you help? Report a suspected pest. Now, with smartphones and the internet, new, easier and faster ways are available for reporting a suspicious pest, such as the Report a Pest Online Form and the Report a Pest Mobile App.

State and Local Government

Alaska Department of Fish and Game.

Your vigilance could help us intercept and prevent the spread of an unwanted biological invader – an invasive species that shouldn’t be here and which could cause serious harm to Alaska’s native fish and wildlife species, and their habitats.

Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food, and Forestry. Consumer Protection Services.

If you suspect you have any of the invasive insects or disease on our list, take a picture and send it to us. Or, fill out the form and just let us know about it! Your personal information will be kept confidential, but we may need to contact you for further information.

Maryland Department of Natural Resources.

Do you hike, ride, bird, camp, fish, or otherwise recreate in state parks, forests or wildlands? Lend YOUR eyes to help Maryland's biodiversity! The Maryland Natural Heritage Program designed Statewide Eyes to allow volunteers and researchers alike to collect more information about invasive plants on state lands quickly. Volunteers (like you!) use a free mobile application called the Mid-Atlantic Early Detection Network (MAEDN) to identify, photograph and map the location of invasive plants, focusing on ecologically significant sites.

Academic

University of Nebraska - Lincoln. Nebraska Invasive Species Program.

Please complete this form to report a sighting of an invasive species. If you're not sure how to answer a question, do your best and we will contact you with any questions. If you have any questions for us, please feel free to contact us.