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Invasive Species Resources

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Mississippi River Basin Panel on Aquatic Nuisance Species.
Rapid response actions are often complex, costly, and controversial, and therefore advanced planning for rapid response prior to an introduction is crucial. The Mississippi River Basin Panel on AIS (MRBP) has developed this model rapid response plan and supplemental attachments to assist natural resources management agencies effectively plan and quickly implement rapid response actions. In addition to providing information on rapid response planning, the model plan includes a template that can be used by states in developing their own rapid response plans. See also: MRBP Documents for more resources.

Secretariat of the Pacific Community.

Recently, the health of coconut palms has come under severe threat. The Pacific Community (SPC), working with Pacific Island countries and territories, and development partners, is looking for ways to meet this threat before it devastates the hopes of economic progress in the region. In August of 2017 an alert was issued identifying a new danger to the Pacific, which is causing devastation to coconut palms and expanding rapidly across the region. The new threat comes from a longstanding adversary in the region: the rhinoceros beetle.

Aquatic Ecosystem Restoration Foundation.
See also: AREF - Publications for more resources
USDA. FS. Remote Sensing Applications Center.
Geospatial technologies such as remote sensing and geographic information systems (GIS) can reduce costs and increase the efficiency and effectiveness of weed management programs for certain weeds. This site provides information, technical guidance, and resources to help resource managers learn to use these technologies to predict weed invasion, map and monitor weeds, and educate the public about weeds.
Queensland Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (Australia). 
Washington Native Plant Society.
Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program.
Pennsylvania State University. Cooperative Extension.
USDA. Agricultural Research Service.
USDA's Agricultural Research Service (ARS) is rolling out Tellus, its new online communications platform, replacing its legacy AgResearch online magazine. ARS is committed to sharing the stories of its scientists and their successes and looks forward to informing and entertaining viewers about the many ways ARS’ revolutionary research impacts the growing world.

USDA. Agricultural Research Service.

Along the Rio Grande in Texas, tiny insects are taking a big bite out of an invasive weed that competes for limited water resources vital to agriculture and native vegetation. Several years ago, ARS scientists released two insect species as part of a biocontrol program to kill giant reed (Arundo donax).

USDA. Agricultural Research Service.
Emerald ash borer (EAB) is an invasive insect from Asia that kills ash trees. EAB was first detected in North America in 2002. Several tiny wasp species are helping to control EAB.
Agriculture & Horticulture Development Board (United Kingdom).

Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission.

See also: Aquatic Invasive Species for more action plans

Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission.
See also: Aquatic Invasive Species for more action plans
University of Minnesota. Minnesota Aquatic Invasive Species Research Center.
Southeast Exotic Pest Plant Council.
University of Alaska - Anchorage. Alaska Center for Conservation Science.
University of Alaska - Fairbanks. Cooperative Extension Service.
The Alaska Integrated Pest Management program wants to recruit YOU as a Citizen Scientist. Our goal is to educate individuals who enjoy observing the natural world and are curious about learning more about what they see. The more citizen scientists looking for insect, plant and disease organisms throughout our state, the better informed we are on current issues that may impact our environment, natural resources and food supply.