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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources, with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.

North Carolina State University. Cooperative Extension. Going Native: Urban Landscaping for Wildlife with Native Plants.

Texas Parks and Wildlife Department.
Barataria Terrebonne National Estuary Program.

Idaho State Department of Agriculture.

Kentucky Exotic Pest Plant Council.
University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture. Division of Regulatory Services.

USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

APHIS developed this list of 59 pests and diseases that could pose a significant risk to U.S. food and agriculture resources. The list is not meant to be all-encompassing, but rather focus on the most impactful pests and diseases. The goal remains to keep the U.S. free of these foreign pests and diseases. Section 12203 of the 2018 Farm Bill requires pest- and disease-planning activities that mirror the extensive planning efforts APHIS already performs. Specifically, it requires APHIS to develop a uniform list of pests and diseases that represent the gravest threat to the U.S. and to develop comprehensive response plans to ensure Federal and State governments are prepared to respond to them.

See also: News Release - APHIS Seeks Feedback on List of Animal and Plant Pest and Disease Threats (Aug 6, 2020) and Clarifications for Stakeholders – Farm Bill Section 12203

Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation. Lakes and Ponds Program.

Georgia Exotic Pest Plant Council.

Ohio Department of Natural Resources.

See also: Injurious Aquatic Invasive Species for more resources

Oklahoma Administrative Code.

University of Florida. Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Extension.

Florida is a national and global hot spot for non-native, invasive species. Because researchers and land managers in Florida have been dealing with invasive species for decades, there is an abundance of resources available to the public regarding invasive species. Sometimes, the volume of available information can be confusing. There are five different primary lists of non-native plant species that are referenced in Florida: 1. The Federal Noxious Weed List, 2. The Florida Noxious Weed List, 3. The Florida Prohibited Aquatic Plant List, 4. The Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council (FLEPPC) Plant List, and 5. The UF/IFAS Assessment of Non-Native Plants. This document aims to inform the general public, land managers, researchers, local and state policy makers, and others who seek guidance in accessing regulatory and nonregulatory non-native plant lists in the state of Florida. This publication explains the origins of the lists, meaning of inclusion on a particular list, and ways to access each of the lists.

Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation, and Forestry. Maine Natural Areas Program.

See also: Official 2019 Endorsement of the Advisory List of Invasive Plants (PDF | 711 KB) by the Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry.

Maryland Department of Agriculture.

See also: Maryland Invasive Plants Prevention and Control for more information about the Maryland Invasive Plant Regulations

Massachusetts Invasive Plant Advisory Group.
Massachusetts Department of Agricultural Resources.

Michigan.gov.

Some invasive species are legally designated by the State of Michigan as either "prohibited" or "restricted." If a species is prohibited or restricted, it is unlawful to possess, introduce, import, sell or offer that species for sale as a live organism, except under certain circumstances.