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Washington

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Spotlights

  • Washington State Noxious Weed Control Board.
    The Washington State noxious weed list is updated every year, and all Washington residents can submit proposals to add or remove species, change the class of a listed noxious weed, or to change the designated area in which control is required for a Class B noxious weed. Anyone, including citizens, tribes, organizations, government agencies, and county noxious weed control boards may participate in the listing process by submitting a proposal or by submitting testimony about proposed changes to the noxious weed list. In fact, Washington's open, inclusive listing process is lauded by other states for its encouragement of public participation. Learn more about the listing process here.
  • Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office.

    To help combat the $1.3 billion threat invasive species pose to Washington's economy every year, the Washington Invasive Species Council is inviting the public to the frontlines of its work by detecting invasive species and reporting them on its newly improved WA Invasives app. The free app enables anyone to report a plant or animal by collecting photographs, geographic coordinates, and sighting information. Users recreating in the backcountry also can collect data offline, when cellular service isn't available. The app also acts as digital field guide.
  • Washington Invasive Species Council.
    The states of Oregon, Washington, and Idaho are urging people to report any feral pig sighting by calling a toll-free, public hotline, the Swine Line: 1-888-268-9219. The states hope the hotline will help them eradicate and curb the spread of feral pigs and provide a better sense of the number of pigs here. See also: Agencies Encourage Reporting of Feral Swine (Nov 21, 2016). The Washington Invasive Species Council, Washington Department of Agriculture, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, and U.S. Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service have issued a news release asking landowners, hikers, hunters, and other recreationists to report feral swine.
  • Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office.
    Tribal, state and local governments will join forces at Lake Roosevelt this week to combat the spread of northern pike, recently recorded just two dams away from critical Columbia River salmon habitat. “We are at a critical moment in time where northern pike have not spread into salmon habitat,” said Kelly Susewind, director of the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife. “If northern pike move downstream, the State of Washington will consider this an environmental emergency. We need to work together to stop northern pike.”

    Anglers fishing downstream of the Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee dams are asked to kill the fish immediately and report sightings to the Washington Invasive Species Council. “We need everyone to find and report invasive species. By being alert and reporting any species that you think might be out of place or a problem, you might be saving us millions in management costs and protecting billions in economic and environmental damages and loss.”
  • Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.
    The Washington State Watercraft Passport is free and available for use by the public. The passport is primarily designed for Washington residents who regularly transport recreational watercraft in and out of the state, but is available to any boater. The passport can help boaters to keep track of the waters they've visited and aquatic invasive species (AIS) inspection stations they've stopped at.
  • Washington Invasive Species Council.

    The Washington Invasive Species Council created the Washington Invasive Species Education, or WISE, Web site to inform people about the invasive species problem, how invasive species are spread and introduced (pathways), and how we all can be part of the solution. By raising awareness of invasive species, we will help prevent their spread and impacts. Let's all be WISE!

State Specific Threats

Selected Resources

The section below contains selected highly relevant resources for this locaton, organized by source. To view all related content for this location, click on "View all resources for location" in the top left of this page.

Council or Task Force

Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office.

Federal Government

DOI. Fish and Wildlife Service.

State and Local Government

King County Department of Natural Resources (Washington). Water and Land Resources Division.
Washington State Department of Agriculture.
Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Thurston County Noxious Weed Control (Washington).

Washington State Noxious Weed Control Board.

Academic

Washington State University Extension.

Professional

Washington Native Plant Society.
Pacific Biodiversity Institute (Washington).