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Tennessee

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Spotlights

  • Tennessee Department of Agriculture.

    The Tennessee Department of Agriculture (TDA) is advising forest landowners to monitor their sassafras trees after detecting new cases of laurel wilt disease in Robertson and Hamblen Counties. In the last quarter of 2019, the disease was detected in trees in Montgomery, Cheatham, Dickson and Williamson Counties. "These new detections of this invasive disease show a significant geographic jump across the state," State Forester David Arnold said. "This is yet another unfortunate example of an invasive pest impacting our forests. Landowners should take caution to prevent the spread of this disease if detected on their property."

    Laurel wilt is a fungal disease caused by an invasive pathogen, Raffaelea lauricola, which can affect a range of plants, including sassafras and spicebush in Tennessee. Choked of water, trees wilt and die within a few weeks or months. Currently, no treatment has been developed that can cure laurel wilt disease or protect trees from infection. The best way to prevent the spread of laurel wilt is to avoid movement of firewood or other untreated timber. Tennesseans are urged to monitor their sassafras trees for browning of leaves, leaf loss, and staining in the inner bark. If you suspect your trees might have laurel wilt disease, contact Forest Health Program Specialist Sam Gildiner at 615-837-5439 or sam.gildiner@tn.gov. TDA Division of Forestry staff will assist in identifying the disease and recommending management actions, if appropriate.

  • Tennessee Department of Agriculture.
    The Tennessee Department of Agriculture, United States Department of Agriculture – Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services, Tennessee Department of Health, and University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture (UTIA) has announced the detection of the invasive Asian longhorned tick in Tennessee. The Asian longhorned tick has now spread to 11 states. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that there is no evidence that the tick has transmitted pathogens to humans or animals in the U.S. Two Asian longhorned ticks were recently found on a dog in Union County, and five were found on a cow in Roane County. In the U.S., the tick has been reported on 17 different mammal species.
  • Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency.

    The TWRA needs your help in collecting invasive carp. If you catch a small carp, nine inches or less, the agency is asking that you put it on ice or freeze it and contact them immediately. If you are unable to keep the fish, the TWRA asks you to submit photos of the fish in hand and send it to them. You can contact the TWRA by phone at 731-423-5725 or toll-free at 1-800-372-3928, by fax at 731-423-6483, or by email at ans.twra@tn.gov.

  • Tennessee Department of Agriculture.
    Thousand Cankers Disease (TCD) poses a serious problem to the health of the black walnut tree. Tennessee Department of Agriculture officials urge area residents and visitors to help prevent the spread of TCD:
    • Don't transport firewood, even within Tennessee.
    • Don't buy or move firewood from outside the state.
    • Watch for signs of infestation in your walnut trees.
    If you suspect your walnut tree could be infected with TCD, refer to the TCD Symptoms Checklist to alert state plant and forestry officials, or call TDA's Consumer and Industry Services Division at 1-800-628-2631.
  • Tennessee Bat Working Group.
    White-nose Syndrome is a mysterious disease that is killing bats across the northeast United States. Many research projects are underway to help in the fight against WNS, from researching fungicides to modeling the spread and affects of the syndrome. If you would like to help there are many ways in which you can:
    • Report any unusual bat activity (bats flying in the daytime) or unexplained bat deaths to your regional TWRA office. Or check out the Report a Bat Link on this website.
    • Donate to a number of funds collecting money for WNS research (see National Speleological Society and Bat Conservation International pages below).
    • Adhere to state and federal cave closure advisories.
    • Encourage state and federal agencies to assist in WNS research and monitoring activities.

State Specific Threats

Selected Resources

The section below contains highly relevant resources for this locaton, organized by source. Or, to display all related content view all resources for Tennessee.

Council or Task Force

Tennessee Invasive Plant Council.

Partnership

Tennessee Department of Agriculture.

Federal Government

State and Local Government

Tennessee State Government.
Tennessee Department of Agriculture.
Tennessee Department of Agriculture. Ellington Agricultural Center.
Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency.
Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency.

Academic

University of Tennessee. Institute of Agriculture.