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New York

Provides selected New York resources from agencies and organizations with an interest in the prevention, control, or eradication of invasive species.

Spotlights

  • NYDEC and Canal Corporation Announce Comprehensive Effort to Protect New York's Waters from Aquatic Invasive Species Round Goby

    • Mar 24, 2022
    • New York State Department of Environmental Conservation.

    • The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) and the New York State Canal Corporation today announced a new comprehensive effort, including a new rapid response plan, to combat the potential spread of the round goby, an aquatic invasive species, to the Lake Champlain Basin following the discovery of the fish in the Hudson River near Troy in July 2021. The round goby is one of the biggest threats to New York waters, particularly Lake Champlain, and DEC lists round goby as a prohibited invasive species in the New York Code of Rules and Regulations. Native to Europe and Asia, this fish was introduced in the Great Lakes in 1990, and spread throughout the lakes' system. Round goby reproduces quickly, outcompetes native benthic fish species for food and habitat, eats the young and eggs of other fish, and can transport botulism up the food chain to waterfowl. Working with partners, the agencies will develop a rapid response plan to take effect before the opening of the Canal system on May 20 to identify appropriate actions if round goby enter the Champlain Canal.

  • New York State DEC Tracking New Threat to Beech Trees

    • Jul 15, 2022
    • New York Department of Environmental Conservation.

    • The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) today announced that Beech Leaf Disease (BLD), which affects all species of beech trees, was identified in 35 counties in New York State to date. DEC began tracking BLD in 2018 after it was confirmed in Chautauqua County. Fourteen of the counties with BLD were confirmed in 2022, and more are likely to be identified. At this time there are no specific recommendations for managing trees that are infected with BLD, however, DEC encourages the public to report potential BLD infections using iMapInvasives to help track the disease while research is ongoing. For more information about beech leaf disease, visit DEC's website. For questions about potential tree pests or pathogens, email photos and a description to foresthealth@dec.ny.gov.

  • NYDEC Launches New Aquatic Invasive Species Requirements for Motorized Boats in Adirondack Waters

    • Jun 6, 2022
    • New York State Department of Environmental Conservation.

    • The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) has announced measures to prevent the further spread of aquatic invasive species in the Adirondacks. Recent changes to state Environmental Conservation Law become effective on Wednesday, June 8, 2022, and require motorized boat users to obtain certification that they have inspected and removed potentially harmful aquatic invasive species before launching in waters in, and immediately adjacent to, the Adirondack Forest Preserve. To learn more about the New York State Watercraft Inspection Steward Program, the new certification requirements, and where to find a boat steward, please visit DEC's website.

  • New York State Launches Innovative Effort to Combat Spotted Lanternfly

    • Feb 8, 2021
    • New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets.

    • The New York State Departments of Agriculture and Markets (AGM) and Environmental Conservation (DEC), and the Office of Parks, Recreation, and Historic Preservation (Parks) today announced an innovative effort to combat the spread of Spotted Lanternfly (SLF) in New York State. A new online interface will allow volunteer members of the public to assist in surveying for SLF and tracking associated data. The program encourages broader surveying for SLF and increased public awareness of this invasive pest, following confirmed finds of SLF in New York State this past fall.

      The new initiative, which launched this week, invites volunteers to sign up to survey a specific area, or grid, of land on iMapInvasives. This online, GIS-based data management system is used to assist citizen scientists and natural resource professionals to protect against the threat of invasive species. Volunteers will also enter data from their survey work into iMapInvasives. More information about the program, including upcoming webinars, can be found at https://www.nyimapinvasives.org/slf.

  • NYS DEC Encourages Delaware River Anglers to Report Invasive Snakehead Sightings

    • Aug 26, 2020
    • New York State Department of Environmental Conservation.

    • New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Commissioner Basil Seggos today encouraged anglers in the Delaware River to be on the lookout for northern snakehead, an invasive fish native to Southeast Asia. A northern snakehead was recently caught in the Callicoon area of the Delaware River. Given the right environmental conditions, this invasive species can prey on and compete with other fish, upsetting the natural balance of local ecosystems. "Northern snakeheads are listed federally as injurious wildlife, and New York State law prohibits their live possession," Commissioner Seggos said. "Any snakehead caught should be killed immediately and not released back into the water." In the event an angler catches a northern snakehead, DEC advises anglers to report the catch to the regional NYS DEC fisheries office, DEC's Invasive Species Bureau at isinfo@dec.ny.gov or (518) 402-9425, or submit a report through iMapinvasives.

  • New York Invasive Species Information - Emerald Ash Borer

    • New York Invasive Species Clearinghouse.

    • Emerald ash borer was first confirmed in New York in June 2009 near Randolph, in western Cattaraugus County. The rapid spread of the beetle through North America is most likely due to the transport of infested firewood, ash nursery stock, unprocessed ash logs, and other ash products. In an effort to slow the continued spread of EAB, both Federal and New York State agencies have instituted quarantines of infested areas to regulate the transport of ash products.

State Specific Threats

Selected Resources

The section below contains highly relevant resources for this location, organized by source.

Partnership
State and Local Government
Academic
Professional