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Michigan

Provides selected Michigan resources from agencies and organizations with an interest in the prevention, control, or eradication of invasive species.

Spotlights

  • MDARD Proposes Exterior Firewood Quarantine to Protect Michigan Trees and Forests from Invasive Species

    • Oct 14, 2021
    • Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development.

    • The Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development (MDARD) is proposing an Exterior Firewood Quarantine (PDF | 192 KB) to prevent the introduction of unwanted plant pests and diseases into Michigan. Public comments on the proposal are due by Friday, November 19, 2021. Over 140 pests and diseases can be moved by firewood, including Asian long-horned beetle, mountain pine beetle and spotted lanternfly. These pests are not known to exist in Michigan but could be accidentally brought into the state by travelers transporting firewood.

      Members of the public interested in providing feedback on this proposed quarantine can submit their comments to Mike Bryan, MDARD Export and Compliance Specialist by emailing BryanM@Michigan.gov. The deadline for comments is Friday, November 19, 2021. Additional information is available at Michigan.gov/Invasives and on MDARD's plant pest quarantine webpage.

  • Beech Leaf Disease Added to Michigan's Invasive Species Watch List

    • Jan 20, 2021
    • Michigan Department of Natural Resources.

    • The Michigan departments of Natural Resources and Agriculture and Rural Development today announced the addition of beech leaf disease to the state's invasive species watch list. Invasive species on the watch list have been identified as posing an immediate or potential threat to Michigan's economy, environment or human health. These species either have never been confirmed in the wild in Michigan or have a limited known distribution. Beech leaf disease is associated with the microscopic worm Litylenchus crenatae, a nematode that enters and spends the winter in leaf buds, causing damage to leaf tissue on American beech and European and Asian beech species. Infestations result in darkened, thick tissue bands between leaf veins, creating a striped effect on the leaves, leaf distortion and bud mortality. Trees weakened by leaf damage become susceptible to other diseases and can die within six years. Beech leaf disease has not been found in Michigan. The disease was first discovered in Ohio in 2012. Since then, it has been identified in seven eastern states and Ontario.

  • Dreaded Didymo - or 'Rock Snot' - Found in Upper Manistee River, Michigan

    • Dec 6, 2021
    • Michigan Department of Natural Resources.

    • The Michigan departments of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy and Natural Resources confirmed a report of didymo, a nuisance freshwater alga, in a stretch of the Upper Manistee River in Kalkaska County. Also known as rock snot despite its coarse, woolly texture, didymo can grow into thick mats that cover the river bottom. The Manistee River finding marks the first detection of didymo blooms in the Lower Peninsula. In 2015, extensive mats of didymo were found on the Michigan side of the St. Marys River near Sault Ste. Marie in the Upper Peninsula.

      If you observe didymo in the water, either as small, cotton ball-sized patches or thick blankets with rope-like strings that flow in currents, take photos, note the location and report it by using the Midwest Invasive Species Information Network, available online at MISIN.MSU.edu or as a downloadable smartphone app. The MISIN smartphone app will take a GPS location point if a report is made at the site; it also will allow you to upload photos with a report. Find more information on didymo and how to identify it at Michigan.gov/Invasives.

  • Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development Urges Continued Vigilance After Dead Spotted Lanternfly Cases Identified in Michigan

    • Nov 16, 2020
    • Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development.

    • The Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development (MDARD) is asking freight carriers, warehouse workers and delivery drivers to be on the lookout for invasive spotted lanternfly after the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) confirmed dead spotted lanternfly insects were found in Michigan in recent weeks. While the specimens found were dead, these cases demonstrate one of the many ways this insect could find its way into the state. There is no evidence of established populations of spotted lanternfly in Michigan.

      If you find a spotted lanternfly egg mass, nymph or adult, take one or more photos, make note of the date, time and location of the sighting, and report to the Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development, MDA-Info@Michigan.gov or call MDARD's Customer Service Center, 800-292-3939. If possible, collect a specimen in a container for verification. For additional information on identifying or reporting spotted lanternfly, visit Michigan.gov/SpottedLanternfly.

  • Michigan's Invasive Species Program - Watch List

    • Michigan.gov.

    • Invasive species on the watch list have been identified as posing an immediate or potential threat to Michigan's economy, environment or human health. These species either have never been confirmed in the wild in Michigan or have a limited known distribution. If you think you have found any of these species in Michigan, please report the occurrence via the methods given by clicking on an individual species name. View the watch list as a printable PDF [PDF | 210 KB].

  • Midwest Invasive Species Information Network

    • Michigan State University. Midwest Invasive Species Information Network.

    • The Midwest Invasive Species Information Network (MISIN) is a regional data aggregation effort to develop and provide an early detection and rapid response (EDRR) resource for invasive species in the Midwest region of the United States.

State Specific Threats

Selected Resources

The section below contains highly relevant resources for this location, organized by source.

Council or Task Force
Partnership
  • Michigan's Invasive Species Program

    • Michigan's Invasive Species Program.

  • Northwest Michigan Invasive Species Network

    • Northwest Michigan Invasive Species Network.

  • Woody Invasives of the Great Lakes Collaborative

    • Midwest Invasive Plant Network; Great Lakes Restoration Initiative.

    • The Woody Invasives of the Great Lakes Collaborative provides information related to woody invasive species identification, distribution, impacts, regulatory status, and control and management. The collaborative has also developed recommendations on trees, shrubs and vines that gardeners and landowners can plant as alternatives to known woody invasives. The WIGL Collaborative was founded in early 2018 and is coordinated by the staff of the Midwest Invasive Plant Network (MIPN).

State and Local Government
Academic
  • Center for Exotic Species

    • Michigan Technological University. Forest Resources and Environmental Science.

  • Clean Boats, Clean Waters

    • Michigan State University Extension.

    • Clean Boats, Clean Waters reminds boaters to clean, drain and dry their equipment to prevent the spread of aquatic invasive species.

  • Invasive Species

    • Michigan Sea Grant.

  • Michigan Integrated Pest Management Program

    • Michigan State University.

    • The IPM Program collaborates with faculty and Extension educators to develop diverse information serving growers of many crops, the landscape/turf “green” industry, and those looking for home and garden pest solutions.