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Alabama

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Spotlights

  • Alabama Department of Agriculture & Industries.
    A plant disease that presents a serious threat to the U.S. citrus industry has been detected in Alabama. Federal and state plant health officials have confirmed the identification of citrus greening (CG), also known as Huanglongbing or HLB, which is caused by the bacterial pathogen Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus. This is the first confirmation of citrus greening in Alabama despite biannual surveys for the pathogen by the Alabama Department of Agriculture and Industries (ADAI).
  • Alabama Department of Agriculture & Industries.

    U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) officials have confirmed the first detection of sweet orange scab (SOS) in Alabama. The fruit sample was collected in Baldwin County by Alabama Department of Agriculture and Industries' (ADAI) plant protection inspectors during a delimiting survey for citrus greening disease. The Auburn University Plant Diagnostic Clinic provided the initial diagnosis of SOS, and USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) Plant Protection and Quarantine (PPQ) program lab personnel confirmed the diagnosis. SOS is a plant disease caused by the fungus Elsinöe australis and does not pose a threat to human or animal health. The disease is appropriately named as it results in scab-like lesions on fruit rinds and, less often, on leaves and twigs of sweet oranges, limes, lemons, mandarins, satsumas, kumquats, grapefruit, tangerines and tangerine hybrids. This is the first confirmed case of SOS in Alabama despite annual surveillance for citrus pathogens by ADAI plant protection inspectors.

State Specific Threats

Selected Resources

The section below contains highly relevant resources for this locaton, organized by source. Or, to display all related content view all resources for Alabama.

Council or Task Force

Southeast Exotic Pest Plant Council.

State and Local Government

Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources.

Alabama Forestry Commission.

Provides resource sheets and information on various aspects of the life of a forest that a landowner may need to understand the management of their lands. They generally describe various stages of the growth of a forest stand from: the selection of a tree species, site preparation, planting, growing the trees over time, thinning, pest management problems that might occur, wildlife considerations, and harvesting.

Academic

Alabama Cooperative Extension System.
Alabama Cooperative Extension System.