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Invasive Species Resources

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University of Alaska - Anchorage. Alaska Center for Conservation Science.
See also: Non-Native Plant Species List for additional factsheets (species biographies) and species risk assessment reports of non-native species present in Alaska and also non-native species currently not recorded in Alaska (potential invasives)
University of Alaska - Anchorage. Alaska Center for Conservation Science.
See also: Non-Native Plant Species List for additional factsheets (species biographies) and species risk assessment reports of non-native species present in Alaska and also non-native species currently not recorded in Alaska (potential invasives)
University of Alaska - Anchorage. Alaska Center for Conservation Science.
See also: Non-Native Plant Species List for additional factsheets (species biographies) and species risk assessment reports of non-native species present in Alaska and also non-native species currently not recorded in Alaska (potential invasives)
University of Alaska - Anchorage. Alaska Center for Conservation Science.
See also: Non-Native Plant Species List for additional factsheets (species biographies) and species risk assessment reports of non-native species present in Alaska and also non-native species currently not recorded in Alaska (potential invasives)
International Council for the Exploration of the Sea.
See also: Alien Species Alert for more information
Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology.
Note: Nesting Behavior
Entomological Society of America. Entomology Today.
Invasive insect and arthropod species make for a lot of scary headlines—think emerald ash borer, spotted lanternfly, and Asian longhorned tick, just to name a few. But success stories in invasive-species response are out there. They just need to be told. One of those success stories is the eradication of the European grapevine moth (Lobesia botrana) in northern California after it was found there in 2009. A cooperative, multipronged response effort kept infestations from running wild, and it was declared eradicated in 2016, two years after the last adult moth was caught in the region. The story of this effort is recounted, along with analysis of the invasion’s dynamics, in a study published in January in the Annals of the Entomological Society of America.
Iowa State University. Center for Food Security and Public Health.
Iowa State University. Center for Food Security and Public Health.
Iowa State University. Center for Food Security and Public Health.
Iowa State University. Center for Food Security and Public Health.
Iowa State University. Center for Food Security and Public Health.
Iowa State University. Center for Food Security and Public Health.
Iowa State University. Center for Food Security and Public Health.
Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade, and Consumer Protection.
Montana Department of Livestock. Animal Health Division.
University of Michigan. Museum of Zoology.
University of Michigan. Museum of Zoology.