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Invasive Species Resources

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University of Arizona; USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service; Arizona Department of Agriculture.

This list of the most serious biotic pests and pathogens is maintained by the State (Arizona Department of Agriculture) and Federal (USDA) regulatory agents. Their goal is to prevent the introduction and/or spread of these pests/pathogens in our state.

New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets. Cooperative Agricultural Pest Survey.

See also: Forest Health Invaders for more fact sheets

Delaware Invasive Species Council.
Be on the lookout for these up-and-coming invaders! They might not be in Delaware yet, but our best defense is early detection and rapid response!
San Diego County Agriculture Weights and Measures (California).

University of California - Davis. Agriculture and Natural Resources.

ANR Publication 8068
New Hampshire Department of Agriculture, Markets, and Food.
Boxwood blight is a disease affecting plants in the family Buxaceae including boxwoods (Buxus), Pachysandra, and Sarcococca plants. First detected in the U.S. in 2011, it has since been found in multiple states and provinces from the East Coast to the West Coast. Boxwood blight has now been confirmed on boxwood nursery stock in New Hampshire. New Hampshire nurseries, landscapers, town officials and residents responsible for boxwood plantings should learn the symptoms associated with boxwood blight. Watch for black lesions on stems, "zonate" brown spots on leaves leading to chlorosis, and leaf drop. If boxwood blight is suspected on recently purchased boxwoods, or plants in proximity to recently purchased boxwoods, please contact the Division and collect a sample for analysis by the UNH Plant Diagnostic Lab.
Virginia Tech; Virginia State University. Virginia Cooperative Extension.
Boxwood blight (also called "box blight" in Europe), caused by the fungal pathogen Cylindrocladium pseudonaviculatum (=C. buxicola), was found for the first time in the United States in North Carolina, Virginia and Connecticut in 2011. The first reported infestation in the U.S. was in a North Carolina nursery and the disease was introduced to Virginia on plants from that nursery. Spread outside the two Virginia locations, both of which are fields owned by a single nursery, has not been reported. However, growers should be aware of the symptoms of boxwood blight and monitor nursery and landscape boxwoods for symptoms.
Georgia Forestry Commission.
Cogongrass, Imperata cylindrica (L.), is considered the seventh worst weed in the world and listed as a federal noxious weed by USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service - Plant Protection and Quarantine. Cogongrass infestations are being found primarily in south Georgia but is capable of growing throughout the state. Join the cogongrass eradication team in Georgia and be a part of protecting our state's forest and wildlife habitat. Report a potential cogongrass sighting online or call your local GFC Forester.
Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food, and Forestry. Oklahoma Forestry Services.
Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food, and Forestry. Oklahoma Forestry Services.
With the quarantine of ash trees in Arkansas, the threat of the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) to millions of Oklahoma ash trees intensifies for southeastern Oklahoma, especially McCurtain and Le Flore counties. As the pest is literally next door, Oklahoma Forestry Services is asking Oklahomans to help prevent the infestation spread and be on the lookout and report any signs that the insect is in the state. Please notify Oklahoma Forestry Services at 405-522-6158 if you see signs of EAB infestation in ash trees. For more information about the Emerald Ash Borer visit www.forestry.ok.gov/tree-pest-alerts.
Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries.
Iowa State University. Extension and Outreach. Pesticide Safety Information Program.
The emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis, is an exotic insect pest from Asia. The flattened, creamy white larval stage feeds below the bark and cuts off the living, water and nutrient conducting vessels causing tree death. EAB has been found in 13 Iowa counties (Allamakee, Black Hawk, Boone, Bremer, Cedar, Des Moines, Henry, Jasper, Jefferson, Muscatine, Story, Union, and Wapello). As of February 2014, all 99 counties in Iowa have been quarantined (Treatment Map) by the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship to slow the movement of this destructive pest to non-quarantined areas/states.
Wyoming State Forestry Division.
Emerald ash borer (EAB) was confirmed in Boulder County, Colorado in September 2013. This marks the first time EAB has been detected in Colorado as well as the first detection of EAB in any western state. EAB has not been detected in Wyoming. See Forest Health Management for related EAB information.
Louisiana Department of Agriculture and Forestry.
The emerald ash borer, a severe insect pest of ash trees, was confirmed in Webster Parish in February 2015, making Louisiana the 25th state to confirm the presence of this beetle. In 2014, the LDAF started a "Don’t Move Firewood" campaign which is geared toward educating people about the risks of transporting pests to other locations where some can do harm. It is best to purchase firewood not more than 10 miles from where it will be burned.
South Carolina Forestry Commission.
The emerald ash borer, a beetle pest that has devastated ash trees throughout the eastern United States, was officially detected in Greenville, Oconee and Spartanburg counties in August 2017. According to a Clemson University press release, the beetles were found Aug. 3 during a routine check of Emerald Ash Borer traps and confirmed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. In response to the discovery of EAB in the Upstate, the State Crop Pest Commission likely will establish a quarantine area involving at least the three affected counties; it is also possible the quarantine could be expanded to additional counties or even the entire state.
Georgia Invasive Species Task Force.
The emerald ash borer is a federally regulated pest, which means its detection will trigger specific regulations that are designed to help prevent its man assisted spread. The USDA, GA Dept. of Agriculture and GA Forestry Commission have been working together to ensure that the regulations minimally impact businesses but at the same time, will limit the likelihood emerald ash borer will be moved in ash nursery stock, or in logs, mulch, firewood, and other similar items.
Kansas Department of Agriculture.
Since the emerald ash borer's initial introduction into the United States, it has been spread to many areas of the country by campers and homeowners who unknowingly moved infested firewood to uninfested areas where the beetles emerged and infested new ash trees. You can help slow the spread of the emerald ash borer into Kansas by not moving firewood across county lines. When buying wood for your home, buy only locally grown and harvested firewood. When camping, buy your firewood near your destination and burn all that you bring. If you suspect emerald ash borer on your property please call 785-564-6698 or e-mail your name, address, phone number and pictures of the suspect tree to ppwc@kda.ks.gov.

Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation, and Forestry.

The emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis, is one of the most serious invasive species threatening our ash resources and forests. All species of ash that grow in Maine are susceptible to injury and death by the emerald ash borer. As of September 2018, EAB has been found in Aroostook Co. (Madawaska, Frenchville, and Grand Isle), and York Co. (Acton and Lebanon), ME. If you suspect emerald ash borer, please report it online, or call: 207-287-3891.

Mississippi Forestry Commission.
Mississippi's ash trees are living on borrowed time. Every day the emerald ash borer is not detected in Mississippi is a minor victory. Infestations in surrounding Tennessee (detected 2010 near Nashville), Arkansas (detected in 2014 near Hot Springs) and north-central Louisiana (2015) continue to expand, despite quarantines in those areas. Most frighteningly, EAB was confirmed in Calhoun County, Alabama in October 2016. EAB now has Mississippi surrounded, and it is likely only a matter of time before it finds its way here. To prevent the spread of this and other non-native beetles, do not move firewood. Firewood is a vehicle for movement of tree-killing forest pests including EAB and Asian longhorned beetle. See Forest Health Articles for more pest alerts.