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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources, with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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DOI. United States Geological Survey.

Invasive species are a subset of non-native (or alien) species, and knowing what species are non-native to a region is a first step to managing invasive species. People have been compiling non-native and invasive species lists ever since these species started causing harm, yet national non-native species lists are neither universal, nor common. Non-native species lists serve diverse purposes: watch lists for preventing invasions, inventory and monitoring lists for research and modeling, regulatory lists for species control, and nonregulatory lists for raising awareness. This diversity of purpose and the lists’ variation in geographic scope make compiling comprehensive lists of established (or naturalized) species for large regions difficult. However, listing what species are non-native in an area helps measure Essential Biodiversity Variables for invasive species monitoring and mount an effective response to established non-native species. In total, 1,166 authoritative sources were reviewed to compile the first comprehensive non-native species list for three large regions of the United States: Alaska, Hawaii, and the conterminous United States (lower 48 States). The list contains 11,344 unique names: 598 taxa for Alaska, 5,848 taxa for Hawaii, and 6,675 taxa for the conterminous United States.

The list is available to the public from U.S. Geological Survey ScienceBase, and the intent, though not a guarantee, is to update the list as non-native species become established in, or are eliminated from, the United States. The list has been used to annotate non-native species occurrence records in the U.S. Geological Survey all-taxa mapping application, Biodiversity Information Serving Our Nation (BISON).

Open-File Report 2018-1156, 15 p., https://doi.org/10.3133/ofr20181156.

North Carolina State University. Cooperative Extension. Going Native: Urban Landscaping for Wildlife with Native Plants.

Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation, and Forestry. Maine Natural Areas Program.

See also: Official 2019 Endorsement of the Advisory List of Invasive Plants (PDF | 711 KB) by the Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry.

University of Minnesota. Minnesota Invasive Terrestrial Plants and Pests Center.
To determine which pests posed immediate threats, MITPPC undertook an expansive evaluation process. It convened 15 expert panelists, who ultimately identified 124 significant invasive species threatening our state. This panel also identified 17 criteria that could be used to rate species in an objective, computerized ranking system. Criteria included factors like environmental and economic impact, ability to establish and spread and proximity to the state. Rankings are updated regularly, no later than every other year or as new threats emerge on a more urgent basis. The full whitepaper, "Minnesota's Top 124 Terrestrial Invasive Plants and Pests: Priorities for Research (PDF | 1.4 MB)," outlines all prioritization methods and results

New Mexico Department of Agriculture.

The Director of the New Mexico Department of Agriculture has selected the following plant species to be targeted as noxious weeds for control or eradication pursuant to the Noxious Weed Management Act of 1998 (updated from 2009). This list does not include every plant species with the potential to negatively affect the state's environment or economy.
See also: Noxious Weed Information for more resources.

University of New Zealand. Massey University.

DOI. USGS. Wetland and Aquatic Research Center.
Provides fact sheets, maps and collection information for aquatic vertebrates and invertebrates occurring outside of their native range.

Colorado Department of Agriculture. Conservation Services Division.

Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, Galveston Bay Estuary Program; Houston Advanced Research Center (HARC).