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Invasive Species Resources

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Friends of Hopewell Valley Open Space; New Jersey Invasive Species Strike Team.

If you have a smartphone, the power to protect the natural heritage of New Jersey is at your fingertips! You can use it to help stop the spread of invasive plants, animals and even pathogens that threaten the natural systems and economy of the Garden State.

University of Arkansas. Cooperative Extension Service.
The collection of digital images is provided as a service to Arkansas agriculture. These images represent symptoms of both pathological (infectious) and non-pathological (physiological/environmental) disorders of agronomic row crops and horticultural crops that grow in Arkansas. These photos are useful as an identification tool to growers of the crops listed.

USDA. Blog.

ID Tools helps agency staff to quickly identify pests, including insects, diseases, harmful weeds, and more, through an efficient, online database system. ID Tools currently includes more than 30 websites covering a vast array of pests and pests associated with specific commodities.

USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.
University of Florida.
Carolinas Beach Vitex Task Force.
University of Georgia. Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health.
Early Detection and Distribution Mapping System (EDDMapS), provides a more accurate picture of the distribution of invasive species. EDDMapS will allow land managers, agencies and others to set priorities for early detection and rapid response (EDRR), as well as formulate overall invasive plant management action plans. Includes distribution data by species and by county.
Auckland Council (New Zealand).
University of Georgia. Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health. Bugwood Blog.
Prepared by: Alabama Cooperative Extension System. ANR-1457. This publication provides descriptions and clear pictures of key characteristics as well as details on how to distinguish several common look-a-like species.
Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council; Orange County Government; University of South Florida.
FLIP (Florida Invasive Plants) is designed to be a mobile field guide that can be accessed by a computer, smart phone, tablet, or other device with internet browser capability. Developed in partnership with the University of South Florida (USF), FLIP currently contains 20 plants: 19 of the 2011 Category I invasive species and one of the 2011 Category II invasive species, as designated by the Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council (FLEPPC).
University of Connecticut. Connecticut Invasive Plant Working Group.

Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation, and Forestry.

USDA. APHIS. PPQ. CPHST. Identification Technology Program.
University of California - Berkeley. Cooperative Extension; USDA. Forest Service.

Nature Conservancy. iMapInvasives.

Includes a variety of published guides and internet resources (videos) for use in identifying invasive species that are found in the participating states, provinces, and regions of the iMapInvasives network. The iMapInvasives network is currently comprised of ten U.S. states and one Canadian province    (Arizona, Florida, Maine, New York, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Saskatchewan, Vermont, Virginia, and West Virginia).

University of Florida. IFAS Extension. Solutions for Your Life.

Many Florida residents find unknown plants growing in their yard, unknown bugs in their houses or gardens, and apparent diseases on what were previously healthy plants. But Florida residents may not know what resources are available to identify these disease, plant, and pest organisms.

USDA. APHIS. PPQ. CPHST. Identification Technology Program.

ITP supports PPQ in its efforts to prevent the entry, spread, and establishment of invasive pests in the U.S. by delivering interactive, electronic identification tools.
See also: ID Aids which supports identification of plant pest of concern to PPQ. Includes over 3,000 vetted ID Aids includes both web and app-based image galleries, keys, fact sheets, screening aids, pest alerts, molecular identification tools, and more. All groups of plant pests are represented.