An official website of the United States government

The .gov means it’s official.
Federal government websites always use a .gov or .mil domain. Before sharing sensitive information online, make sure you’re on a .gov or .mil site by inspecting your browser’s address (or “location”) bar.

This site is also protected by an SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) certificate that’s been signed by the U.S. government. The https:// means all transmitted data is encrypted  — in other words, any information or browsing history that you provide is transmitted securely.

You are here Back to top

Invasive Species Resources

Displaying 61 to 80 of 153

Search Help

South Carolina Forestry Commission.

The South Carolina Forestry Commission is proud to present this guide to some of the most common and problematic invasive species encountered in South Carolina's forests. This publication is the outgrowth of a series of social media posts that the Forestry Commission's Urban & Community Forestry, Forest Health and Communications & Public Information teams produced for National Invasive Species Awareness Week in 2018. The collaboration extended far beyond just that week, however, culminating in this comprehensive, though not exhaustive, catalog of invasive species that continues to grow. For more information, see the Forest Health Insects & Disease Section.

Tennessee Department of Agriculture.
The Tennessee Department of Agriculture, United States Department of Agriculture – Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services, Tennessee Department of Health, and University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture (UTIA) has announced the detection of the invasive Asian longhorned tick in Tennessee. The Asian longhorned tick has now spread to 11 states. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that there is no evidence that the tick has transmitted pathogens to humans or animals in the U.S. Two Asian longhorned ticks were recently found on a dog in Union County, and five were found on a cow in Roane County. In the U.S., the tick has been reported on 17 different mammal species.
Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services.
In May of 2018, the National Veterinary Services Laboratory in Ames, Iowa confirmed the finding of the Haemaphysalis longicornis tick (otherwise known as the East Asian or Longhorned tick) in Virginia. It was previously unknown in the state, but since then has been detected in 24 counties, mostly in the western part of the state. "The tiny tick can appear on cows, horses and other livestock," said State Veterinarian Dr. Charles Broaddus. "In addition to being a nuisance, they also can be a health risk, especially to newborn or young animals." If you believe you have found the Longhorned tick, notify your local office of the Cooperative Extension Service.

University of Florida. Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Extension.

Florida is a national and global hot spot for non-native, invasive species. Because researchers and land managers in Florida have been dealing with invasive species for decades, there is an abundance of resources available to the public regarding invasive species. Sometimes, the volume of available information can be confusing. There are five different primary lists of non-native plant species that are referenced in Florida: 1. The Federal Noxious Weed List, 2. The Florida Noxious Weed List, 3. The Florida Prohibited Aquatic Plant List, 4. The Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council (FLEPPC) Plant List, and 5. The UF/IFAS Assessment of Non-Native Plants. This document aims to inform the general public, land managers, researchers, local and state policy makers, and others who seek guidance in accessing regulatory and nonregulatory non-native plant lists in the state of Florida. This publication explains the origins of the lists, meaning of inclusion on a particular list, and ways to access each of the lists.

Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.

The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources is conducting an immediate response to the capture of 51 invasive carp on the Mississippi River. The invasive carp were caught by two commercial fishing operators near La Crosse and Trempealeau, Wisconsin, during routine spring netting last weekend. In response to this discovery, the DNR is working with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the U.S. Geological Survey, the Wisconsin DNR and commercial fishing operators to conduct large-scale netting, studies of the captured carp and increased monitoring. "The location where these fish were caught is commonly netted because of concentrations of commercially valuable fish," said DNR invasive carp field lead Ben Larson. "This is the largest congregation of invasive carp we've seen this far upstream." Invasive carp have been progressing upstream since escaping into the Mississippi River in Arkansas in the 1970s. These large fish compete with native species and pose a threat to rivers and lakes.

Invasive carp captures must be reported to the DNR immediately. Call 651-587-2781 or email invasivecarp.dnr@state.mn.us. Take a photo and transport the carp to the nearest DNR fisheries office or make arrangements for it to be picked up by a DNR official. More information about invasive carp is available on the Minnesota DNR website.

U.S. Department of Agriculture.
Secretary Perdue Proclaims April as ‘Invasive Plant Pest and Disease Awareness Month’
Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue proclaims the month of April 2019 as Invasive Plant Pest and Disease Awareness Month and encourage all citizens to increase their understanding of invasive plant pests and diseases—specifically, those designated as Hungry Pests, whose destruction has great environmental, ecological, and economic impact on our Nation, states, and communities.

USDA. ARS. Tellus.

Hunting for natural enemies of the red imported fire ant is paying off for Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists. Their latest discovery — a new virus found in fire ants from Argentina — has the potential of becoming a biological control agent against the red imported fire ants infesting the U.S.

Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks.

New this year, nonresidents launching watercraft in Montana must purchase a Vessel AIS Prevention Pass.  

  • The fee for motorboats is $30 and applies to all motorized watercraft that is registered in another state our country.
  • The fee for nonmotorized watercraft is $10 and applies to rafts, kayaks, drift boats, catamarans, and sailboats that nonresidents bring into Montana.
  • The Vessel AIS Prevention Pass expires Dec. 31 and is not transferrable between vessels.

Boaters are reminded that all watercraft coming into Montana from out of state must be inspected prior to launching. Anyone transporting watercraft must stop at all open watercraft inspection stations they encounter. To find a watercraft inspection station or to learn more, go to CleanDrainDryMT.com or call the FWP Aquatic Invasive Species Bureau at 406-444-2440.

Michigan's Invasive Species Program.
If your leisure-time plans include boating or fishing in Michigan, recent changes in Michigan’s Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Act (NREPA) may affect you. Beginning March 21, watercraft users in the state are required to take steps to prevent the spread of aquatic invasive species. Also, anyone fishing with live or cut bait or practicing catch-and-release fishing will need to take precautions to limit the movement of invasive species and fish diseases.

European Commission.

In October 2016, the European Parliament and the Council adopted Regulation (EU) 2016/2031 on protective measures against plant pests (“Plant Health Law”). On 13 December 2016, the Regulation entered into force and will be applicable from 14 December 2019. The new rules aim to modernise the plant health regime, enhancing more effective measures for the protection of the Union's territory and its plants. The Plant Health Law increases the prevention against the introduction of new pests via imports from third countries. Commission Implementing Regulation (EU) 2018/2019 establishes the list of high risk plants the introduction of which into the EU territory will be provisionally prohibited from 14 December 2019 until a full risk assessment has been carried out. Published in the Official Journal on 11 October 2019, the Commission Delegated Regulation (EU) 2019/1702 lists 20 quarantine pests as priority pests, including Xylella fastidiosa, the Japanese beetle, the Asian long-horned beetle, Citrus greening and Citrus Black Spot, whose economic, environmental and social impact on EU territory is the most severe.

Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.

Commissioners approved rule changes in Chapter 68-5, F.A.C., regarding nonnative species on February 21, 2019. The new rules will add high-risk nonnative animals to the Prohibited list and clarify rule language by defining key terms. The rules also include provisions for people currently in personal or commercial possession of these species. All rule changes will become effective on May 2, 2019. The 90-day grace period will begin on May 2, 2019 and end on July 31, 2019. Have questions? Contact us at NonnativeSpeciesRules@MyFWC.com, or see New Nonnative Species Rules for more information.

New Prevention Topics

USDA. NAL. National Invasive Species Information Center.

Watercraft Inspection and Decontamination Programs - Many Western states instituted watercraft inspection and decontamination programs after the discovery of invasive mussels in Lake Mead in 2007. This section provides resources on mandated watercraft inspection and decontamination programs, as well as some non-mandated but state-funded watercraft inspection efforts.

Aquatic Invasive Species Decals - Some U.S. states require that boaters purchase an aquatic invasive species decal (sometimes called a stamp, sticker, or permit) before operating watercraft in that state. Many of these regulations were instituted as a response to the spread of zebra and quagga mussels into the Western U.S. Fees from the purchase of these decals are typically used to fund local aquatic invasive species outreach and prevention activities.

USDA. Forest Service.

In partnership with USDA Forest Service, Wildlife Forever recently unveiled a new Clean Drain Dry Rapid Response Communication Kit (PDF | 4.4 MB) to help communities with invasive species. Informing the public is critical in slowing the spread. The readymade communication tools are designed for immediate distribution or can be customized to local needs. Prevention is still the best way to slow the spread and this Rapid Response Kit is designed to do this in two ways:

  • Send out an urgent warning that a local lake has been infested with a specific Aquatic Invasive Species
  • Educate the affected public as to what they can – and should – do to help prevent further spread of the species

DOI. United States Geological Survey.

Researchers from Dickinson College and the U.S. Geological Survey collaborated on field research to understand the ability of human searchers to detect the invasive brown treesnake (BTS) on the island of Guam. Due to their nocturnal and tree-dwelling habits, these snakes are extremely difficult to detect, especially when they are present at low densities in an area. A new study published in the journal Ecosphere helps explain why and provides valuable information on optimizing search methods and search locations that could be valuable if the BTS was accidentally introduced to a snake-free island.

Great Lakes Commission.
Aquatic invasive species inflict millions of dollars of ecological and economic damage to the Great Lakes, with impacts on coastal industries, water quality, native fish and wildlife and human health. Recently, Blue Accounting, in partnership with state and federal agencies, launched a new suite of web-based resources and tools to support early detection of aquatic invasive species in the Great Lakes. The earlier new aquatic invasive species are detected, the easier and less expensive it is to avoid potentially devastating consequences of a large invasion. The new tools released by the Blue Accounting initiative help target efforts to focus on high-risk species and locations across the 11,000 miles of shoreline and 94,000 miles of surface area that make up the Great Lakes basin.

USDA. ARS. Tellus.

Agricultural Research Service (ARS) researchers in Florida have developed “attract-and-kill” traps to control Asian citrus psyllids in the suburbs where citrus trees are popular landscape plantings.

Our new Web site for the National Invasive Species Information Center recently launched. We hope you find the new site easier to use and find the invasive species you are looking for.

Please check out  highlights of our major changes. Please feel free to contact us if you have questions or if you would like to provide feedback.

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

Wisconsin's recently revised aquatic invasive species (AIS) management plan is now final and available for use by the public after receiving approvals from the National Aquatic Nuisance Species Task Force. Wisconsin last completed an AIS management plan in 2002. Wisconsin's AIS management plan serves multiple purposes, including maintaining Wisconsin's eligibility for funding and directing the AIS efforts of the DNR and partner groups. The new plan also introduces an invasion pathway management approach that will help Wisconsin systematically limit how invasive species move into and throughout Wisconsin. The plan can be downloaded here (PDF | 3.89 MB).

DOC. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

New research by NOAA and partners finds that two species of invasive Asian carp -- the bighead carp and silver carp, collectively known as bigheaded carps -- could be capable of establishing populations in Saginaw Bay, Lake Huron and affecting the health of ecologically and economically important fish species such as yellow perch. The research, appearing online in the journal Biological Invasions, is based on a new model that simulates interactions between the bigheaded carps and a range of fish species, including walleye, yellow perch, and groups lower on the food web over a time period of 50 years. Over 180 non-indigenous aquatic species have already become established in the Great Lakes, with a handful of these producing substantial negative impacts. While bigheaded carps are established in watersheds near the Great Lakes, they have not yet become established in the Great Lakes.

Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture.

Pennsylvania Agriculture Secretary Russell Redding today announced that twelve counties have been added to Pennsylvania's Spotted Lanternfly quarantine zone ahead of the 2020 spring hatch. With this addition, the quarantine (PDF | 506 KB) for this invasive pest is now at 26 counties. The new dozen counties are not completely infested, but rather have a few municipalities with a known infestation (PDF | 803 KB) which led to a quarantine being placed on the entire county out of an abundance of caution. Allegheny, Beaver, Blair, Columbia, Cumberland, Huntingdon, Juniata, Luzerne, Mifflin, Northumberland, Perry, and York have been added to the quarantine for 2020. For more information on Spotted Lanternfly in Pennsylvania, visit https://agriculture.pa.gov/spottedlanternfly.