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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources (alphabetically), with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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Maine Department of Environmental Protection.

Courtesy boat inspections are the cornerstone of the state's invasive aquatic species prevention program. Limited funds are available for locally initiated CBI programs. Grants up to $2000 are available to municipal and county governments, quasi-municipal organizations (including water districts) and 501C(3) eligible organizations such as lake associations. The State of Maine also uses a Request for Proposal (RFP) process to solicit applications for plant control work.

Michigan.gov.

Grants are available to assist with prevention, detection, eradication and control of terrestrial and aquatic invasive species in Michigan. Each grant program has specific goals, eligibility requirements and application deadlines.

Mid-Atlantic Panel on Aquatic Invasive Species.

The Mid-Atlantic Panel on Aquatic Invasive Species (MAPAIS) is offering a small grants competition to encourage interested groups and individuals to submit proposals for possible funding.

Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.

Minnesota Department of Agriculture.

Counties, municipalities, and weed management entities (including weed management areas) may apply for grants to address noxious weeds and invasive plants, with priority given to species on the noxious weed list. This grant request is not to be confused with the Cooperative Weed Management Area (CWMA) grant program administered by the Minnesota Board of Water and Soil Resources (BWSR).

Upper Columbia Conservation Commission; Montana Invasive Species Council.

Michgan Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy.

The Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy’s Water Resources Division announces a new grant program to aid in the control or eradication of aquatic invasive plants in Michigan’s inland lakes. This year, approximately $100,000 will be available through the Aquatic Invasive Plant (AIP) Control Grant for the reimbursement of permit fees required for projects to control or eradicate inland lake aquatic invasive plant species using physical, biological or chemical control activities that occur in 2019. The grant handbook and application process are currently being developed. The handbook will contain detailed information on eligibility, instructions for applying for the grant, and items to be included with the grant application. Grant applications will be accepted from June 1 through July 1. The handbook will be made available on the Michigan Aquatic Invasive Plant Control Grant Program webpage on June 1.

New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services.

Grant funds are available for the control, prevention and research of state-listed aquatic invasive plants. Grants are available to local lake associations and municipalities for control and/or prevention of state-listed exotic aquatic plants, and to institutions of higher learning for in furthering research associated with exotic aquatic plant management, control, biology, ecology or prevention.

New York Department of Environmental Conservation.

The newly consolidated Invasive Species Grant Program combines previous opportunities, such as the Aquatic Invasive Species Spread Prevention and the Aquatic and Terrestrial Invasive Species Early Detection/Rapid Response grants, to create a single grant program designed to support projects that target both aquatic and terrestrial invasive species. In addition, the Invasive Species Grant program allows applications for two new categories: Lake Management Planning and Aquatic and Terrestrial Invasive Species Research.

California Department of Fish and Wildlife.

The Funding Opportunity for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife QZAP FY2020 has officially been posted. The total funding amount for projects is approximately $1,830,000.00, which is a significant increase from years past. This opportunity will be open for application through October 18, 2020.

Pennsylvania State University.

An $800,000 grant from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will support a two-year effort to control and prevent the spread of aquatic invasive species across Pennsylvania, with an emphasis on the Lake Erie Basin. The funding, through the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, supports efforts to implement Pennsylvania’s Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS) Management Plan. It will directly support nine field projects to prevent or control the spread of aquatic invasive species, including: targeted control of Hydrilla (Hydrilla verticillata) in Pymatuning Lake; the removal of red-eared slider turtles from Presque Isle Bay; and surveys of Natural Heritage Areas within the Lake Erie watershed.

California Department of Parks and Recreation. Division of Boating and Waterways.

As part of its mission, the Division of Boating and Waterways manages the Quagga and Zebra Mussel Infestation Prevention Grant Program, which supports preventative plans that help protect California’s reservoirs from a dreissenid mussel infestation. California State Parks Division of Boating and Waterways (DBW) will accept applications for the 2021 Quagga and Zebra Mussel Infestation Prevention Grant Program: March 22, 2021 - April 30, 2021, subject to available funds.

Minimum Eligibility Requirements:
Grant applicant must own/manage any aspect of the water in a reservoir where recreational activities are permitted; Grant applicant must demonstrate that the reservoir is uninfested with dreissenid mussels; and the reservoir must be open to the public.

RiversEdge West.

The mission of RiversEdge West (formerly the Tamarisk Coalition) is to advance the restoration of riparian lands through collaboration, education, and technical assistance. One of the most challenging aspects of conducting restoration work can be acquiring and maintaining adequate funding to support the full spectrum of restoration efforts. To that end, RiversEdge West has developed a variety of tools intended to help practitioners secure funding to support this work.
USDA. FS. Southern Research Station. CompassLive.

White-nose syndrome (WNS) has killed more than six million bats over the past decade. WNS is caused by the fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Pd). Studies show that bats eat enough insect pests to save the U.S. corn industry more than $1 billion a year in crop damage and pesticide costs, and more than $3 billion per year to all agricultural production including forests.
 

To help fund the research needed to combat this deadly disease, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced $2.5 million in grants for research of high priority questions about WNS that will improve our ability to manage the disease and conserve affected bats.

U.S. Department of Agriculture.
This workbook contains basic information on programs in USDA that could be used to fund and support invasive species related projects. This list should be a helpful place to start a search for sources of technical and financial resources for invasive species activities but may not include all potential invasive species funding opportunities. USDA contacts for program support listed in the document are current at the time of publication. The contacts listed in the "other grant information" section can assist you in determining which opportunities may fit best with your needs.

DOI. Fish and Wildlife Service.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) is providing much needed support in the fight against the bat-killing fungal disease white-nose syndrome (WNS) through an additional $1 million in grants to 39 states and the District of Columbia. WNS has killed millions of North American bats in recent years, decimating many populations and putting several species at additional risk of extinction.

DOI. Fish and Wildlife Service.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) announced today that a team of six researchers from Oregon State University and the University of California, Santa Cruz are the winners of a national prize challenge to combat white-nose syndrome (WNS), a lethal wildlife disease that has killed millions of bats in North America and pushed some native bat species to the brink of extinction. The Service's White-nose Syndrome Program launched the challenge last October as part of a multi-faceted funding strategy to develop management tools to fight the disease. A total of 47 proposed solutions were submitted for permanently eradicating, weakening or disarming Pseudogymnoascus destructans, the fungus that causes WNS, thereby improving survival in bat species affected by the disease. A panel of 18 experts from academic institutions, federal agencies and nongovernmental organizations evaluated the challenge entries based on readiness, deployment scale, species susceptibility, ease of use, cost efficiency, efficacy and risk to resources.

In the coming months, the Service will announce a second challenge to offer an additional $80,000, as we continue to pursue novel, innovative solutions that could help us permanently eradicate, weaken, or disarm the fungus that causes white-nose syndrome. The Service plans to hold additional idea prize challenges in the future to invite solvers with a diverse array of knowledge, skills, expertise and perspectives to help the agency tackle today’s toughest conservation issues.

United States Department of Agriculture.
The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) announced today it is offering $75 million in funding for the eradication and control of feral swine through the Feral Swine Eradication and Control Pilot Program (FSCP) in a joint effort between USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) and Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS). The 2018 Farm Bill included this new pilot program to help address the threat that feral swine pose to agriculture, ecosystems and human and animal health. Additional information on the complete funding announcement and about specific pilot projects, including target areas and the roles for which partner assistance is being requested, can be found on the FSCP webpage.