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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources (alphabetically), with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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Aquatic Nuisance Species Task Force.

Many teachers and students are unaware of the impacts of disposing unwanted live specimens (animals, plants, and microorganisms) into local waters, letting them go down drains or flushing them down the toilet. Recent releases of concern include goldfish, red swamp crayfish, Brazilian elodea, and red-eared slider turtles! It may seem simple and kind hearted, but releases can reduce biodiversity, water quality, harm fishing and native species. Besides not being good for the environment, releases are illegal in most states.
See also: Aquatic Nuisance Species (ANS) Task Force - Other Documents for more resources

California Foundation for Agriculture in the Classroom.

See also: Stop the Invasion Fact Sheet Set for more resources

California Foundation for Agriculture in the Classroom.

See also: Stop the Invasion Fact Sheet Set for more resources

California Foundation for Agriculture in the Classroom.

See also: Stop the Invasion Fact Sheet Set for more resources

California Foundation for Agriculture in the Classroom.

With the Stop the Invasion Fact Sheet Set, students will read about six different invasive species, the damage they cause and how to stop their spread. The accompanying lessons and activities are aligned to California Common Core and Next Generation Science Standards. This resource was funded through a Specialty Crop Block grant from the California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA).