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Invasive Species Resources

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Ohio State University. College of Food, Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.

Ohio State University Extension has released a new app for spotting and tracking invasive species -- non-native organisms such as Asian carps, purple loosestrife and Asian longhorned beetle -- to try to keep them from setting up beachheads and hurting the economy and environment. By using the free Great Lakes Early Detection Network app, a person can take pictures of suspected invasive species -- whether of farm, forest or water -- and upload the pictures and locations for verification. Based on this early warning, scientists can send out alerts, map the spread and figure out a battle plan.

Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council.

See also: Publications - Flyers for more climbing fern resources

Portland State University (Oregon).

University of Massachusetts - Amherst. MassWoods Forest Conservation Program.

We need your help to "outsmart" invasive species in Massachusetts. If you have a smartphone or a digital camera, the power to protect the natural heritage of Massachusetts is already in your hands. Join the Outsmart Invasive Species Project to help stop the spread of non-native plants and insects that threaten our environment.

Washington State Department of Agriculture.

Asian giant hornet is the world's largest species of hornet. In December 2019, WSDA received and verified four reports of Asian giant hornet near Blaine and Bellingham. These are the first-ever sighting in the U.S. Canada had also discovered Asian giant hornet in two locations in British Columbia in the fall of 2019. If it becomes established, this hornet will have serious negative impacts on the environment, economy, and public health of Washington State. If you think you may have spotted an Asian giant hornet, report it using the Hornet Watch Report Form.
See also: Learn more about Asian giant hornets and WSDA’s program to eradicate them.

Government of British Columbia. Ministry of Agriculture.

Three Asian Hornets (Vespa mandarinia) were found in the Nanaimo area on Vancouver Island in mid-August. The identification has been confirmed by Canadian and international experts. This is the first time this insect has been found in British Columbia. Please report suspected Asian giant hornet sightings to the Invasive Species Council of British Columbia.

Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management. Cooperative Agricultural Pest Survey.
We are currently monitoring these exotic pests as part of the Cooperative Agricultural Pest Survey (CAPS). If you think you've discovered a pest not native to Rhode Island, and particularly if you suspect the pest to be the Asian Longhorned Beetle or the Emerald Ash Borer, please report it.

Mississippi Forestry Commission.

"Help Stop the Pop", MFC's popcorn tree control program, aims to track popcorn trees, assist municipalities with popcorn tree control, and educate landowners about proper tree removal. Chinese tallow trees, also known as the popcorn tree, are deceptive. They look attractive and ornamental, but they are actually highly invasive and will quickly damage the native ecosystem wherever they are planted. By reporting the location of these trees, you can help the Mississippi Forestry Commission (MFC) get a full picture of Mississippi's popcorn tree problem, which is the first step to combating the spread of this invasive species. Help the MFC stop the spread of this invasive species. Report sightings to HelpStopThePop.com. More Information visit the MFC's Chinese Tallow Tree information page.

Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office.

To help combat the $1.3 billion threat invasive species pose to Washington's economy every year, the Washington Invasive Species Council is inviting the public to the frontlines of its work by detecting invasive species and reporting them on its newly improved WA Invasives app. The free app enables anyone to report a plant or animal by collecting photographs, geographic coordinates, and sighting information. Users recreating in the backcountry also can collect data offline, when cellular service isn't available. The app also acts as digital field guide.

Purdue University.
A major tool in the fight against invasive species is the Report INvasive website, hosted by Purdue College of Agriculture and the Indiana Invasive Species Council. The website includes several ways that people can report invasive species, including a smartphone app from the Great Lakes Early Detection Network. “There are not that many specialists and experts covering the state,” Sadof said. “When there are concerned citizens reporting, however, we have many more eyes and a better chance of detecting and eradicating a harmful species early.”

Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food, and Forestry. Consumer Protection Services.

If you suspect you have any of the invasive insects or disease on our list, take a picture and send it to us. Or, fill out the form and just let us know about it! Your personal information will be kept confidential, but we may need to contact you for further information.

University of Nebraska - Lincoln. Nebraska Invasive Species Program.

Please complete this form to report a sighting of an invasive species. If you're not sure how to answer a question, do your best and we will contact you with any questions. If you have any questions for us, please feel free to contact us.

Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office. Washington Invasive Species Council.

We need your help! If you think you have found an invasive species in Washington, please let us know by reporting it.

Environmental Protection Agency.
EPA considers incident report data to help inform our pesticide regulatory decisions. Information from these reports will help us identify patterns of bee kills associated with the use of specific pesticides or active ingredients.

Maryland Department of Natural Resources.

Spotted lanternfly is a threat to Maryland and the U.S. The Maryland Department of Agriculture issued a quarantine October 28, 2019 in an effort to contain the invasive species in Cecil and Harford counties after the spotted lanternfly was spotted in Cecil’s northeastern corner and along Harford’s northern border. See additional resources on the Maryland Department of Agriculture's site for Spotted Lanternfly for up-to-date information.

For questions related to the quarantine, permitting, treatment, or to report a sighting of the spotted lanternfly, especially outside of the quarantine zone, call 410-841-5920 or email DontBug.MD@maryland.gov. If you report a spotted lanternfly via email, please provide the location of the sighting and your contact information.

University of Georgia. Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health.

The Southeast Early Detection Network (SEEDN) app brings the power of Early Detection and Distribution Mapping System (EDDMapS) to your smartphone. Now you can submit invasive species observations directly with your smartphone from the field. These reports are uploaded to EDDMapS and e-mailed directly to local and state verifiers for review. SEEDN is more than just a smartphone app; it is an integrated invasive species reporting and outreach campaign for the Southeastern United States that includes the app and the EDDMapS website.

Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office. Washington Invasive Species Council.

The states of Oregon, Washington, and Idaho are urging people to report any feral pig sighting by calling a toll-free, public hotline, the Swine Line: 1-888-268-9219. The states use hotline information to quickly respond to a feral swine detection, helping to eradicate and curb the spread of the invasive species. See also: Feral Swine Fact Sheet (PDF | 208 KB) and Squeal on Pigs! Poster (PDF | 20.6 MB)

Massachusetts Department of Agricultural Resources.
The Massachusetts Department of Agricultural Resources (MDAR) announced today that a single dead specimen of the invasive pest known as spotted lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula) was reported and confirmed at a private residence in Boston. As a result, MDAR is urging the public to check for signs of spotted lanternfly adults in any potted plants that they may have received over the holiday season and to report any potential sightings of this pest on MDAR's online reporting form by taking photographs and collecting a specimen if possible. Residents should look for large, gray insects, about one inch long, with black spots and red underwings.
USDA. APHIS. Plant Protection and Quarantine.
State Plant Health Directors (SPHD) direct federal APHIS-PPQ pest detection and regulatory activities in cooperation with state officials. SPHDs coordinate the initial PPQ emergency response if an exotic pest is detected in the state. To report a pest, contact your local APHIS office or call USDA Customer Service toll free at 1-844-820-2234 (Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Eastern).