An official website of the United States government.

The .gov means it’s official.
Federal government websites always use a .gov or .mil domain. Before sharing sensitive information online, make sure you’re on a .gov or .mil site by inspecting your browser’s address (or “location”) bar.

This site is also protected by an SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) certificate that’s been signed by the U.S. government. The https:// means all transmitted data is encrypted — in other words, any information or browsing history that you provide is transmitted securely.

Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources, with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

Displaying 61 to 80 of 297

Search Help

Chesapeake Bay Program.

Island Conservation.

The future is looking a little brighter for seabirds in French Polynesia following the first successful removal of invasive rats in the Marquesas Archipelago. The project, implemented by the Societe d’Ornithologie de Polynesie (Manu), Island Conservation, BirdLife International and Association Vaiku’a i te manu o Ua, will protect a nationally significant population of 90,000 Sooty Terns. Invasive rats present on the island devoured seabird eggs and chicks and native plants. Free from invasive rats, seabirds can once again safely nest and native plants can grow tall and thrive.

Food and Fertilizer Technology Center.

Fremont County Weed and Pest Control (Wyoming).
Bowman's Hill Wildflower Preserve (Pennsylvania).

Invasive Species Centre (Ontario).

Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research.
Tip of the Mitt Watershed Council (Michigan).
Alliance for the Great Lakes.
Today the U.S. Senate passed legislation which changes how ballast water discharges from ships – the most common pathway for invasive species to enter the Great Lakes – are regulated. Great Lakes champions in the Senate worked tirelessly to improve the Vessel Incidental Discharge Act (VIDA), which was included in the U.S. Coast Guard Authorization Act of 2017, and protect the Great Lakes.
Great Lakes Fishery Commission.

The commission funds projects submitted to the Fishery Research and Sea Lamprey Research Programs ranging from U.S.$10,000 to U.S.$100,000 per year (average approximately U.S.$40,000) that generally run for 2-3 years. For more information, review the current call for proposals. Projects that meet particular criteria can also be funded as pilot projects or through the Technical Assistance Program.

Great Lakes Environmental Law Center.
Great Lakes Law is an independent online resource (blog) by by Professor Noah Hall, which provides news, analysis, and commentary on all things wet and legal in the Great Lakes region. Includes various categories related to aquatic invasive species.

Missouri Prairie Foundation.

Grow Native! is the native plant marketing and education program of the Missouri Prairie Foundation. Grow Native! helps protect and restore biodiversity by increasing conservation awareness of native plants and their effective use in urban, suburban, and rural developed landscapes.

Gulf States Marine Fisheries Commission.

Instituto de Investigaciones Marinas y Costeras (Institute for Marine and Coastal Research, Colombia).

Special Note: In Spanish

Environmental Law Institute.
A report by attorney Read D. Porter that examines coordination on aquatic invasive species (AIS) prevention among the Chesapeake Bay states. The report focuses on prevention-related legal authorities in Virginia, Maryland, and Pennsylvania in particular, and recommends actions to improve regional cooperation both within the existing regulatory frameworks and through potential amendments to state laws and regulations to enhance prevention.

Texas State Historical Association.

Morton Arboretum (Illinois).
Morton Arboretum (Illinois).
Morton Arboretum (Illinois).