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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources, with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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Iowa State University. Center for Food Security and Public Health.
University of Arkansas. Cooperative Extension Service.
The collection of digital images is provided as a service to Arkansas agriculture. These images represent symptoms of both pathological (infectious) and non-pathological (physiological/environmental) disorders of agronomic row crops and horticultural crops that grow in Arkansas. These photos are useful as an identification tool to growers of the crops listed.

University of Florida.

University of Nebraska - Lincoln. Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources.

University of Guam.

The University of Guam received another round of funding in September under the U.S. Department of Agriculture Plant Protection Act for the surveying and monitoring of invasive pests of solanaceous crops that are on USDA’s Priority Pest List for 2021. Solanaceae, or nightshades, are a family of flowering plants that include tomato, eggplant, and chili pepper. As part of the national effort this year, UOG was awarded $38,000 to survey and monitor for two pests: Tuta absoluta, which is a moth and type of leafminer capable of destroying an entire crop, and Ralstonia solanacearum race 3 biovar 2, which is a bacterium, known as a bacterial wilt, that infects through the roots and is deadly to plants.

The work through UOG better prepares the island to manage these invasive species if or when they arrive. "There are certain pathogens and insects that have a reputation of being really bad. These are two of them," said project lead Robert L. Schlub, a researcher and faculty member of UOG Cooperative Extension and Outreach with a doctorate in plant pathology. "They aren’t on Guam, but if they show up, we want to know so we can help get them under control."

Michigan State University. Integrated Pest Management Program.
Provides information about exotic plant pests with the highest potential to enter Michigan. These likely invaders are presented in fact sheets with descriptions of their biology and how to identify them. Risk maps forecast locations where invasives are likely to establish.
Washington Sea Grant.

University of Illinois. Extension.

Mississippi State University. Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station.
The primary goal of this service is to provide Mississippi citizens with identification and management recommendations for insect pests that affect their homes, their gardens, or the crops they are trying to produce. The lab also works closely with the Mississippi Department of Agriculture and observant Mississippi citizens to help facilitate early detection of new invasive insect pests that appear in the state.
University of Minnesota. Forest Resources Extension. My Minnesota Woods.
University of Minnesota. Forest Resources Extension.
In 2008, the University of Minnesota Extension, the Minnesota Department of Agriculture Plant Protection Division, and the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources Division of Forestry combined efforts and rolled out the Emerald Ash Borer First Detector Program, part of the National Plant Diagnostic Network. Here in Minnesota, we chose to focus on and provide in-depth training for a specific pest, the emerald ash borer, to increase our chances of finding the targeted pest. Since 2008, the training has expanded to include several other pests of national concern.

Rutgers University. New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station.

The Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) is a significant nuisance for homeowners and can be devasting for farmers. Learn how to identify BMSB and how to report a sighting of BMSB (in all U.S. states/territories and several countries).
University of Nebraska - Lincoln.
New Mexico State University. Cooperative Extension Service.
The Plant Diagnostic Clinic is designed to provide plant diagnostic services for the state of New Mexico. The clinic also facilitates insect and weed identification through referrals to other specialists.
Purdue University.
A major tool in the fight against invasive species is the Report INvasive website, hosted by Purdue College of Agriculture and the Indiana Invasive Species Council. The website includes several ways that people can report invasive species, including a smartphone app from the Great Lakes Early Detection Network. “There are not that many specialists and experts covering the state,” Sadof said. “When there are concerned citizens reporting, however, we have many more eyes and a better chance of detecting and eradicating a harmful species early.”
University of California. Agriculture and Natural Resources.

North Carolina State University. Extension.

Learn about some of the common species of wasps, bees and other non-wasp species, such as hover flies and robber flies, that superficially resemble the Asian giant hornet.

University of Wisconsin-Madison.
The Wisconsin First Detector Network (WIFDN) is a citizen science network that empowers people to take action against invasive species through invasive species monitoring, management, and outreach. WIFDN provides training and resources through a combination of webinars, instructional videos, and hands-on workshops, in addition to providing volunteer opportunities to citizen scientists. Consider becoming a First Detector and help improve our network to minimize the impact and spread of invasive species in Wisconsin.