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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources (alphabetically), with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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University of Wisconsin. Extension Lakes Program. Citizen Lake Monitoring Network.
University of Wisconsin. Extension Lakes Program. Citizen Lake Monitoring Network.

University of Arkansas. Cooperative Extension Service.

The collection of digital images is provided as a service to Arkansas agriculture. These images represent symptoms of both pathological (infectious) and non-pathological (physiological/environmental) disorders of agronomic row crops and horticultural crops that grow in Arkansas. These photos are useful as an identification tool to growers of the crops listed.

University of Wisconsin. Extension Lakes Program.
The Clean Boats, Clean Waters volunteer watercraft inspection program is an opportunity to take a front line defense against the spread of aquatic invasive species.
Purdue University Extension. Forestry and Natural Resources (Indiana).
Publication FNR-421-W
See also: Forestry and Natural Resources publications

Oklahoma State University. Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources.

Indiana University.

While climate change is a burden to many species, it’s a boon to some non-native plants and animals. The sudden population growth and expansion of unchecked species can have a detrimental effect on native habitat, agriculture, and human health. Environmental Resilience Institute researchers are working to understand the risks posed by disease-carrying insects, such as tick and mosquitoes, and how invasive species are affecting established ecosystems. See also: Climate Implications – Invasive Species and Pests.

University of Wisconsin.

University of Arkansas. Cooperative Extension Service.

See also: Urban Entomology/Pest Management in Arkansas for more factsheets
North Dakota State University.

University of Wisconsin Sea Grant.

You could say that preventing the spread of aquatic invasive species (AIS) is a team sport. While it takes the professional efforts of natural resource managers, AIS specialists and others in the environmental field, it also takes the cooperation of the public. Yet for community members to take necessary actions, they must first be aware of the negative impacts AIS can have and how to stop their spread. Communicating with them about AIS in an effective way is vital.

New research from Wisconsin Sea Grant Aquatic Invasive Species Outreach Specialist Tim Campbell, University of Wisconsin-Madison Associate Professor Bret Shaw and consultant Barry T. Radler sheds new light on such communication. The researchers analyzed which communication strategies are most effective and which may pose unintended problems. The team's findings were published online Aug. 14 in the journal Environmental Management (“Testing Emphasis Message Frames and Metaphors on Social Media to Engage Boaters to Learn about Preventing the Spread of Zebra Mussels”).

North Dakota State University.

Purdue University.
A major tool in the fight against invasive species is the Report INvasive website, hosted by Purdue College of Agriculture and the Indiana Invasive Species Council. The website includes several ways that people can report invasive species, including a smartphone app from the Great Lakes Early Detection Network. “There are not that many specialists and experts covering the state,” Sadof said. “When there are concerned citizens reporting, however, we have many more eyes and a better chance of detecting and eradicating a harmful species early.”
University of Wisconsin-Madison.
The Wisconsin First Detector Network (WIFDN) is a citizen science network that empowers people to take action against invasive species through invasive species monitoring, management, and outreach. WIFDN provides training and resources through a combination of webinars, instructional videos, and hands-on workshops, in addition to providing volunteer opportunities to citizen scientists. Consider becoming a First Detector and help improve our network to minimize the impact and spread of invasive species in Wisconsin.

University of Wisconsin. Extension.

The University of Wisconsin Nutrient and Pest Management Program (NPM) and Integrated Pest Management Program (IPM)—work to bring research-based information regarding Wisconsin farm profits, water quality, pest management, pesticide use practices, and nutrient management planning to Wisconsin farmers and landowners.