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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources, with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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U.S. Government Printing Office. Electronic Code of Federal Regulations.

U.S. Government Printing Office. Electronic Code of Federal Regulations.

U.S. Government Printing Office. Electronic Code of Federal Regulations.

U.S. Government Printing Office. Electronic Code of Federal Regulations.

U.S. Government Printing Office. Electronic Code of Federal Regulations.

U.S. Government Printing Office. Electronic Code of Federal Regulations.

U.S. Government Printing Office. Electronic Code of Federal Regulations.

U.S. Government Printing Office. Electronic Code of Federal Regulations.

U.S. Government Printing Office. Electronic Code of Federal Regulations.

U.S. Government Printing Office. Electronic Code of Federal Regulations.

U.S. Government Printing Office. Electronic Code of Federal Regulations.

U.S. Government Printing Office. Electronic Code of Federal Regulations.

USDA. FS. Southern Research Station. CompassLive.

Electronic noses are sensitive to a vast suite of volatile organic compounds that every living organism emits. A new USDA Forest Service study shows that e-noses can detect emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) larvae lurking under the bark – an early, noninvasive detection method. "The results were quite spectacular," says Dan Wilson, a research plant pathologist and lead author of the study. The findings were published in the journal Biosensors.

DOI. United States Geological Survey.
While invasive species prevention is the first line of defense, even the best prevention efforts will not stop all invasive species. Early Detection and Rapid Response (EDRR) is defined as a coordinated set of actions to find and eradicate potential invasive species in a specific location before they spread and cause harm. USGS activities that support EDRR span the geography of the country and address organisms and pathways most appropriate to address the needs of our partners. USGS provides scientific support to DOI Bureaus and other partners to aid in implementation of EDRR efforts and inform management actions.
DOI. United States Geological Survey.
U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2012–5162. The NPS I&M Program, in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Status and Trends Program, compiled this document to provide guidance and insight to parks and other natural areas engaged in developing early-detection monitoring protocols for invasive plants. While several rapid response frameworks exist, there is no consistent or comprehensive guidance informing the active detection of nonnative plants early in the invasion process. Early-detection was selected as a primary focus for invasive-species monitoring because, along with rapid response, it is a key strategy for successful management of invasive species.
USDA. NRCS. Pennsylvania.

DOI. USGS. Fort Collins Science Center.

USDA. Forest Service.
Holmes, Thomas P.; Aukema, Juliann E.; Von Holle, Betsy; Liebhold, Andrew; Sills, Erin. 2009. Economic impacts of invasive species in forest past, present, and future. In: The Year In Ecology and Conservation Biology, 2009. Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci. 1162:18-38.
USDA. FS. Northern Research Station.