An official website of the United States government

The .gov means it’s official.
Federal government websites always use a .gov or .mil domain. Before sharing sensitive information online, make sure you’re on a .gov or .mil site by inspecting your browser’s address (or “location”) bar.

This site is also protected by an SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) certificate that’s been signed by the U.S. government. The https:// means all transmitted data is encrypted  — in other words, any information or browsing history that you provide is transmitted securely.

You are here Back to top

Invasive Species Resources

Displaying 1 to 20 of 95

Search Help

Virginia Tech. Department of Entomology.

University of Vermont. Entomological Research Laboratory.

Vermont Department of Health.

State Agriculture and Health officials announced that the Asian Tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus) has been identified for the first time in Vermont. This normally tropical/subtropical species is a known disease vector for Zika, chikungunya and dengue viruses, infecting humans in countries where these diseases are present. The mosquitoes found in Vermont do not currently carry these viruses. Natalie Kwit, public health veterinarian with the Vermont Department of Health, said that while the discovery of Aedes albopictus in the state is notable, Vermont's climate is currently inhospitable for the mosquito species for most of the year, making it unlikely they will be spreading new diseases here any time soon. "The diseases they can carry are not endemic to our area, and in fact are rarely found anywhere in the United States," said Kwit. For more information, visit Vermont's Mosquito Surveillance Program.

Virginia Tech; Virginia State University. Virginia Cooperative Extension.
This Best Management Practice document is a set of guidelines for home growers of landscape boxwood to avoid introduction of the boxwood blight pathogen into a landscape or, if the disease is already present in a landscape, to manage the disease in the most effective manner and avoid spread of the disease to new locations. See also: Resources for Plant Diseases for more publications
Lake Champlain Land Trust.
Virginia Tech; Virginia State University. Virginia Cooperative Extension.
Boxwood blight (also called "box blight" in Europe), caused by the fungal pathogen Cylindrocladium pseudonaviculatum (=C. buxicola), was found for the first time in the United States in North Carolina, Virginia and Connecticut in 2011. The first reported infestation in the U.S. was in a North Carolina nursery and the disease was introduced to Virginia on plants from that nursery. Spread outside the two Virginia locations, both of which are fields owned by a single nursery, has not been reported. However, growers should be aware of the symptoms of boxwood blight and monitor nursery and landscape boxwoods for symptoms.
Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station. Plant Disease Information Office.
University of Vermont. Forest Pathology.

Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station.

The Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station (CAES) in cooperation with USDA APHIS Plant Protection and Quarantine (PPQ) announce the detection of single live adult spotted lanternfly, Lycoma delicatula, in Southbury, CT. While no other spotted lanternflies were found upon surveying the immediate area, a live insect strongly suggests others may be present within easy transport from somewhere in the region. Additional surveys in the area are planned.

The spotted lanternfly is an invasive sap-feeding planthopper that was discovered in Berks County, Pennsylvania in 2014. It is native to China, India, and Vietnam. It attacks many hosts and has the potential to severely impact Connecticut’s farm crops, particularly apples, grapes, and hops, as well as a number of tree species like maple. Early detection is important for the protection of Connecticut businesses and agriculture. The public is urged to report potential sightings of this invasive pest to ReportSLF@ct.gov. For more information, see the CAES Pest Alert (PDF | 1.9 MB).

Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station.
Connecticut Invasive Plant Working Group.
Connecticut Invasive Plant Working Group.
University of Connecticut. Connecticut Invasive Plant Working Group.
University of Connecticut. Department of Plant Science and Landscape Architecture.
Vermont Agency of Agriculture, Food, and Markets.
Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries.
Vermont Agency of Natural Resources. Department of Forestry, Parks, and Recreation.
Firewood is widely recognized as a major source of non-native forest insect and disease infestations. A rule governing the importation of untreated firewood into Vermont went into effect on May 1, 2016. Visitors to Vermont State Parks, Vermont State Forests, and the Green Mountain National Forest may only bring firewood originating from Vermont or that is heat treated and in its original, labeled package. To help slow the spread of emerald ash borer within Vermont, ash firewood that has not been heat treated should not be moved outside of the Emerald Ash Borer Infested Area in Vermont.

Vermont Invasives.

An emerald ash borer (EAB) beetle was detected in a tree located in Londonderry, VT. The mapped area in Vermont (PDF | 1.25 MB) to which "Slow-the-Spread" recommendations apply now covers:

  • All of Londonderry, Windham, and Landgrove;
  • Most of Jamaica, Winhall, Peru, Weston, Andover and Grafton; and
  • Extends into Chester, Townshend, Stratton, Athens, Mount Tabor, and Wardsboro.

October means that non-flight season Recommendations to Slow the Spread of Emerald Ash Borer are now in effect when moving ash from the infested area. With the heating season underway, and firewood deliveries actively occurring, it’s important to remember that untreated ash firewood should never move out of infested areas. Be sure that your purchase or transportation of both log length and split firewood will not unnecessarily spread EAB. There’s a lot of spread to slow: While the infested area map shows that high-risk areas for EAB include many towns, visibly infested trees still remain rare in Vermont. You can help by following the "Slow-the-Spread" recommendations.

Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station.
See also: Insect Factsheets for more resources