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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources (alphabetically), with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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World Organisation for Animal Health.

Colorado Parks and Wildlife.
Montana State University.
The Center for Invasive Species Management closed in 2015. Archives of relevant materials are available here.

UN. FAO. Animal Production and Health Division.

DOI. USGS. National Wildlife Health Center.
Provides news updates and other resources

Manaaki Whenua Landcare Research (New Zealand).

Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food, and Rural Affairs (Canada).
IUCN. Species Survival Commission. Invasive Species Specialist Group.
Alberta Agriculture and Rural Development (Canada).

Colorado Department of Agriculture. Division of Plant Industry.

Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) was found in Boulder, CO, in September 2013. As a non-native insect, EAB lacks predators to keep it in check. EAB only attacks ash trees in the genus Fraxinus (so mountain ash are not susceptible). EAB is responsible for the death of millions of ash trees in the Midwest. Help protect Colorado's ash trees! Don't move firewood, and consider chemical treatments to protect high-value ash trees.

Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources.

The emerald ash borer is a half-inch long metallic green beetle with the scientific name Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire. Larvae of this beetle feed under the bark of ash trees. Their feeding eventually girdles and kills branches and entire trees. Emerald ash borer was first identified in North America in southeastern Michigan in 2002.

UNFAO. Animal Production and Health Division.

Auckland Council (New Zealand).
Australian Government. Department of the Environment and Energy.
Nature Conservancy. Don't Move Firewood.
Provides specific state information on their firewood regulations and recommendations (includes Canada and Mexico).

Food and Fertilizer Technology Center.

Hawaiian Ecosystems at Risk; Charles Darwin Foundation; Galapagos National Park; Ecuadorian Agricultural Health Service in Galapagos; Galapagos National Institute.

GloBallast Partnerships Programme.

Building Partnerships to Assist Developing Countries to Reduce the Transfer of Harmful Aquatic Organisms in Ships’ Ballast Water, simply referred to as GloBallast Partnerships (GBP), was initiated in late 2007 and is intended to build on the progress made in the original project. This was initially planned as a five-year project, from October 2007 to October 2012, but was extended until June 2017.

Governor's Invasive Species Council of Pennsylvania.