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Invasive Species Resources

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National Plant Diagnostic Network.

First Detector, a program of the National Plant Diagnostic Network (NPDN), equips a nationwide network of individuals to rapidly detect and report the presence of invasive, exotic plant pathogens, arthropods, nematodes, and weeds. If you suspect the presence of a high-impact plant pest or pathogen, contact a diagnostician and submit a sample for diagnosis.

PlantPono.org.

The Hawai'i-Pacific Weed Risk Assessment (HPWRA) is a free service that provides a background check on plants. Professional botanists use published information to answer 49 questions about a plant, to predict whether it is a low-risk or high-risk of becoming invasive in Hawai'i or similar Pacific islands.

University of Hawaii. College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources; USDA. Agriculture Research Service; Hawaii Department of Agriculture.

University of Hawaii. Pacific Cooperative Studies Unit. Hawaii Biodiversity Information Network.

The Hawaii Early Detection Network was created to increase public awareness of invasive species and engage communities in the monitoring of their own neighborhoods. Find out how you help protect the environment of Hawaii by participating in the Eyes and Ears Team and attending an educational workshop or downloading your own field guide. If you are reporting a snake call 911 or for an animal call 643-PEST immediately!

Hawaii Invasive Species Partnership.

USDA. APHIS. PPQ. CPHST. Identification Technology Program.

USDAAPHISPPQCPHST. Identification Technology Program.

Bishop Museum. Hawaii Biological Survey; University of Hawaii.
University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture.
USDA. National Institute of Food and Agriculture.
Map tool allows access to specific colleges and universities (includes Extension) that make up the land-grant university system and provides links to the institution's websites.

National Plant Diagnostic Network.

NPDN is a national network of diagnostic laboratories that rapidly and accurately detect and report pathogens that cause plant diseases of national interest, particularly those that could be deemed to be a biosecurity risk. The specific purpose of the NPDN is to provide a cohesive, distributed system to quickly detect and identify pests and pathogens of concern.

USDA. APHIS. Cooperative Agricultural Pest Survey (CAPS). National Agricultural Pest Information System (NAPIS).
Provides State pest detection contacts, recent state exotic pest news, links to state pest resources, and a list of state CAPS survey targets.
Coordinating Group on Alien Pest Species; Hawai'i Invasive Species Council; Hawai'i Biological Information Network.
DOI. National Park Service; NatureServe. Explore Natural Communities.
DOC. NOAA. National Sea Grant Office.
Provides contact information for State Sea Grant Programs Websites. The Sea Grant Directors lead the 33 Sea Grant programs, the National Sea Grant Law Center, and the National Sea Grant Library based at top universities in every coastal and Great Lakes state, Puerto Rico, and Guam, working to bring the robust intellectual capacity in place at these universities to bear on important societal problems. They coordinate program activities, setting local, regional and national priorities, and work as part of a national network to help citizens and businesses understand, conserve and better utilize America’s coastal, ocean and Great Lakes resources.

StoptheAnt.org.

Little fire ants (LFA) may be tiny, but they pack a powerful sting. Native to South America, these speck-sized invaders have hitchhiked across the Pacific, hidden in imported goods, establishing new populations in islands like Hawai'i. Much smaller than the average ant, LFA are about as long as a penny is thick. Little fire ants may have reached our shores, but we can't treat it like "just another ant." LFA are considered one of the World's 100 Worst Invasive Species (IUCN Invasive Species Specialist Group), because of their ability to reach very high numbers, to the point where people and animals can't avoid stings. It's up to each of us to Spot The Ant and Stop the Ant. Report little fire ants today.

Bishop Museum. Hawaii Biological Survey; University of Hawaii.
University of Kentucky. Kentucky Cooperative Agricultural Pest Survey.
The more people we have looking for invasive pests, the better our chances are to prevent establishment of the pest in Kentucky. If you see a pest (insect, invertebrate, plant disease) that could be one of the exotics featured on this website, let us know!

Google. YouTube; EarthFix Media.

Google. YouTube; Smithsonian Channel.