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Invasive Species Resources

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DOI. NPS. Great Smoky Mountains National Park.
U.S. Government Printing Office. Federal Depository Library Program Electronic Collection Archive.
Compiled and Edited by: Gregory Ruiz and David Reid, NOAA Technical Memorandum GLERL-142.
See also: GLERL Technical Reports for more reports

DOCNOAA. Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory; DOIUSGS. Wetland and Aquatic Research Center.

DOCNOAA. Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory; DOIUSGS. Wetland and Aquatic Research Center.

DOC. NOAA. Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory.
The present database targets nonindigenous aquatic species that are not considered to have been native to any part of the Great Lakes basin. GLANSIS functions as a Great Lakes specific node of the USGS NAS national database.
DOC. NOAA. Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory. Great Lakes Aquatic Nonindigenous Species Information System (GLANSIS).
DOI. Fish and Wildlife Service.
The Partners Program provides technical and financial assistance to private landowners and Tribes who are willing to work with us and other partners on a voluntary basis to help meet the habitat needs of our Federal Trust Species.
USDA. Natural Resources Conservation Service.
NRCS offers technical and financial assistance to help farmers, ranchers and forest managers.

DOD. USACE. Buffalo District.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Buffalo District is on a mission to fight hydrilla, an aggressive plant species that has wreaked havoc from Asia to every continent except Antarctica. "Hydrilla completely chokes out our waterways and impacts all the things we enjoy,” said Michael Greer, USACE Buffalo District project manager." It affects water quality, the economy, businesses, hydropower and flood reduction - ultimately our health and our wallets." Buffalo District’s main projects to eradicate hydrilla are at the Erie Canal and Tonawanda Creek, Tonawanda, NY, as well as on Cayuga Lake near Aurora, NY and Ithaca, NY. The District provides assistance on Pymatuning Lake which borders Pennsylvania and Ohio, and at Raystown Lake in south central Pennsylvania. Buffalo District is also lending expertise to a project on the Connecticut River. Funding for the project is available through the Corps of Engineers Aquatic Plant Control Research Program and Great Lakes Restoration Initiative.

Google. YouTube; DOI. National Park Service. Great Lakes Restoration Initiative.