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Invasive Species Resources

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North Dakota Department of Agriculture.
North Dakota Game and Fish Department.
Arizona Game and Fish Department.
New state regulations to help prevent the spread of quagga mussels and zebra mussels went into effect in Mar 2010. These regulatory measures, known as "Director's Orders," were authorized by the Aquatic Invasive Species Interdiction Act passed by the Arizona Legislature in 2009. The orders contain a list of aquatic invasive species for Arizona, a list of waters where aquatic invasive species are present, and mandatory conditions for the movement of watercraft.
Arizona Game and Fish Department.
See also: Aquatic Invasive Species for additional risk analyses and related species information
North Dakota Game and Fish Department.
Arizona Department of Agriculture.

North Dakota Department of Agriculture.

Feral swine are an invasive species which cause extensive damage to crops, property, and the environment. They are also known to carry over 30 diseases and 37 parasites that can be transmitted to livestock, people, pets, and wildlife. When feral swine are sighted in North Dakota, the State Board of Animal Health should be notified immediately. Attempts will be made to identify whether the swine are truly feral or if they are escaped domestic swine which are private property. Individuals who encounter feral swine should not destroy them unless they encounter feral swine on their own property and there is a threat of harm or destruction of property. As soon as possible following destruction of the animal, but always within 24 hours, the individual must notify the State Board of Animal Health (BoAH) at 701-328-2655.

North Dakota Department of Agriculture.
Arizona Department of Forestry and Fire Management.
North Dakota Game and Fish Department.
View current information on the locations of curlyleaf pondweed, Eurasian watermilfoil, and zebra mussels in North Dakota waters.
Massachusetts Department of Fish and Game. Natural Heritage & Endangered Species Program.
Arizona Department of Forestry and Fire Management.
Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation.
Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation.
Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management.
Massachusetts Department of Agricultural Resources.
North Dakota Department of Trust Lands.
North Dakota Department of Agriculture.
Palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri), an aggressive pigweed species similar in appearance to waterhemp, has been positively identified for the first time in North Dakota in McIntosh County. Palmer amaranth is native to the southwestern U.S. but was accidentally introduced to other areas and has devastated crops in the South and Midwest. It had not been identified in North Dakota until now. The public is urged to work with local weed officers, extension agents and other experts to identify and report suspect plants. More information on Palmer amaranth and other noxious and invasive weeds is available here. To report a suspect plant, contact the North Dakota Department of Agriculture at 701-328-2250 or North Dakota State University Extension at 701-231-8157 or 701-857-7677.
Arizona Department of Agriculture.