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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources, with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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Secretariat of the Pacific Community.

Recently, the health of coconut palms has come under severe threat. The Pacific Community (SPC), working with Pacific Island countries and territories, and development partners, is looking for ways to meet this threat before it devastates the hopes of economic progress in the region. In August of 2017 an alert was issued identifying a new danger to the Pacific, which is causing devastation to coconut palms and expanding rapidly across the region. The new threat comes from a longstanding adversary in the region: the rhinoceros beetle.

Queensland Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (Australia). 

Bay of Plenty Regional Council (New Zealand).

Auckland Council (New Zealand).
New Zealand Ministry for Primary Industries. Biosecurity New Zealand.
Biosecurity officials are promising to take tough action against cargo vessels believed to be infested with brown marmorated stink bug during the upcoming risk season. The risk season runs from September to April, when stink bugs from the northern hemisphere are most likely to crawl into cargo heading to New Zealand. Last season, biosecurity officers intercepted more than 2,500 individual stink bugs at the border, mainly on vessels and cargo.

New Zealand Government.

Prime Minister John Key has today announced the Government has adopted the goal of New Zealand becoming Predator Free by 2050. "While once the greatest threat to our native wildlife was poaching and deforestation it is now introduced predators," Mr Key says. These introduced pests also threaten our economy and primary sector, with their total economic cost estimated at around $3.3 billion a year. "That’s why we have adopted this goal. Our ambition is that by 2050 every single part of New Zealand will be completely free of rats, stoats and possums."

Encyclopedia of New Zealand.
Environment Canterbury Regional Council (New Zealand).

Secretariat of the Pacific Community.

Plant Pest and Quarantine executives and trading partners from 13 Pacific Island countries are in Fiji this week to investigate ways to better prevent and control the introduction and spread of plant pests and diseases across country borders. To address such global issues, the International Plant Protection Convention (IPPC) has drafted International Standard Phytosanitary Measures (ISPM) which have been reviewed by countries, including the Pacific countries attending the three-day Regional International Plant Protection Convention (IPPC) Workshop which concluded yesterday.

New Zealand Department of Conservation.

Predator Free 2050 is an ambitious goal to rid New Zealand of the most damaging introduced predators that threaten our nation’s natural taonga, our economy and primary sector. Join us in eradicating New Zealand's most damaging introduced predators: rats, stoats and possums. Going predator free will bring us a huge range of environmental, cultural, social and economic benefits. Predator Free 2050 aims at milestone goals in every four year period. Find out how far we've come since 2016.

Australian Government. Department of Agriculture and Water Resources.

The Department of Agriculture and Water Resources, on behalf of the Invasive Plants and Animals Committee, conducted a public consultation process on the Australian Pest Animal Strategy and Australian Weeds Strategy for 2017 to 2027, which concluded with the endorsement of both strategies by the National Biosecurity Committee in June 2017. These strategies provide a national framework for addressing pest animals and weeds, while maintaining the profitability and sustainability of Australia’s primary industries and reducing the impact of pest animals and weeds on the environment.
See also: Pest Animals and Weeds in Australia for revised strategies and more information.

Australian Government. Department of Agriculture and Water Resources.

Australia has implemented stronger offshore biosecurity measures for the upcoming brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB) season, to manage risks associated with this significant cargo pest. BMSB emerged as a biosecurity threat for Australia in 2014. They are a threat to a large range of plant species, including fruit, vegetables and ornamental plants. If BMSB was to arrive in Australia, it could significantly impact on the nation's plant health and potentially impact on trade. For more information, visit Seasonal Measures for BMSB.

Northland Regional Council (New Zealand).

Brisbane City Council (Australia).
Australian Government. Department of the Environment and Energy.
Cooperative Research Centre for Australian Weed Management.
Cooperative Research Centre for Australian Weed Management.