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Invasive Species Resources

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Business Queensland (Australia).

Business Queensland (Australia).

Saskatchewan Ministry of Agriculture (Canada).

New Zealand Ministry for Primary Industries.

Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food, and Rural Affairs (Canada).
Western Australia Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development. Agriculture and Food Division.

Canadian Food Inspection Agency.

Bermuda Department of Environment and Natural Resources.
Western Australia Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development. Agriculture and Food Division.
Natural Environment Research Council (United Kingdom). Centre for Ecology and Hydrology.
Scientists have identified 66 alien plant and animal species, not yet established in the European Union, that pose the greatest potential threat to biodiversity and ecosystems in the region. From an initial working list of 329 alien species considered to pose threats to biodiversity recently published by the EU, scientists have derived and agreed a list of eight species considered to be very high risk, 40 considered to be high risk, and 18 considered to be medium risk.
Chinese Academy of Sciences.
Recently, a team led by Prof. LI Yiming from the Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, conducted a comprehensive study evaluating the invasion risk of global alien vertebrates, to help facilitate the balance between development and conservation for the Belt and Road Initiative (BRI). This study, published with the title of "Risks of biological invasion on the Belt and Road" in Current Biology, was online on January 24, 2019. The Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) proposed by China is regarded as the biggest global development program ever to occur on earth. It involves nearly half of our planet across Asia, Europe, Africa, Oceania and America, covering 77% (27/35) global biodiversity hotspots. Its high expenditure into infrastructure constructions may accelerate trade and transportation and thus promote alien species invasions, which is one primary anthropogenic threat to global biodiversity. 
Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food, and Rural Affairs (Canada).
British Columbia Ministry of Agriculture.

Australian Government. Department of Agriculture and Water Resources.

Australia has implemented stronger offshore biosecurity measures for the upcoming brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB) season, to manage risks associated with this significant cargo pest. BMSB emerged as a biosecurity threat for Australia in 2014. They are a threat to a large range of plant species, including fruit, vegetables and ornamental plants. If BMSB was to arrive in Australia, it could significantly impact on the nation's plant health and potentially impact on trade. For more information, visit Seasonal Measures for BMSB.
European Environment Agency.
The purpose of this report is to raise awareness among key stakeholders, decision-makers, policymakers and the general public about the environmental and socioeconomic impacts of IAS. Twenty-eight dedicated species accounts are provided to highlight the various types of impacts. These species accounts are based on thorough, up-to-date scientific information from recent research and studies, and highlight the multifaceted impacts of IAS at both the global and regional levels.

Forestry Commission (United Kingdom). Forest Research.