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Invasive Species Resources

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Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management. Cooperative Agricultural Pest Survey.
See also: Pest Alerts for more resources
Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management. Cooperative Agricultural Pest Survey.
See also: Pest Alerts for more pests
Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management. Cooperative Agricultural Pest Survey.
See also: Pest Alerts - Fruit Pests for more fact sheets
Delaware Department of Agriculture.
Louisiana Department of Agriculture and Forestry.

New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets.

New York Department of Agriculture and Markets.

Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control. Natural Heritage and Endangered Species Program.
Delaware Department of Agriculture.
Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management. Office of Water Resources.
See also: Aquatic Invasive Animals for species of concern

Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management.

Trying to reduce the spread of invasive species in Rhode Island waters, the Department of Environmental Management (DEM) has amended the state's Freshwater Fisheries Regulations to prohibit the transport of any plant or plant part into or out of any Rhode Island waterbody on any type of boat, motor, trailer, fishing supplies, or gear. The new regulation carries a $100 fine for each violation. "Many of the aquatic invasive plants in Rhode Island can reproduce from just one small plant fragment and do not need entire root systems to successfully establish in a new spot," said Katie DeGoosh-DiMarzio, Environmental Analyst with DEM's Office of Water Resources. "Cleaning off every bit of plant from recreational gear used at one pond is essential before visiting another — this includes boats, kayaks, canoes, motors, trailers, paddles, jet skis, fishing gear, waders, water tubes, and anchors. These efforts help combat the spread of aquatic invasive species in Rhode Island waterbodies."

Louisiana Department of Agriculture and Forestry.

Delaware Department of Agriculture.

The spotted lanternfly – a destructive, invasive plant hopper – has been confirmed in New Castle County. Delaware is the second state to have found the insect which was first detected in the United States in 2014, in Berks County, PA. The spotted lanternfly has now spread to 13 Pennsylvania counties.This insect is a potential threat to several important agricultural crops including grapes, apples, peaches, and lumber. State plant health and forestry officials are providing information, fact sheets, photographs, and links to other resources at Delaware's Spotted Lanternfly resource page. Early detection is vital for the protection of Delaware businesses and agriculture.

New Mexico Department of Transportation.

Vegetation control is necessary to slow and/or prevent the spread of noxious weeds. Federal and State Executive orders require the Department to take steps to prevent the spread of invasive or noxious plants.
New York State Department of Environmental Conservation.
Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control. Division of Fish and Wildlife.
Northern snakeheads (Channa argus), an invasive fish, have recently been confirmed in Delaware waters. Three adult snakeheads were collected from the Delaware portion of the Nanticoke watershed: Broad Creek in Laurel, Nanticoke Branch upstream of Seaford, and the Marshyhope at Woodenhawk. The Fisheries Section asks that any possible snakehead catches in any Delaware waters be reported by emailing a photograph and details to edna.stetzar@state.de.us
Google. YouTube; Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control.

Google. YouTube; New York Department of Environmental Conservation.

Google. YouTube; New York Department of Environmental Conservation.