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Invasive Species Resources

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Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program.
Cornell University (New York). New York State Agricultural Experiment Station.
Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management. Office of Water Resources.
You can take actions to prevent the further spread of AIS. It is essential for boaters and recreational users of lakes and ponds to be vigilant!
Colorado Parks and Wildlife.

Arkansas Department of Agriculture.

Located across approximately 39 states, feral hogs cause an estimated $1.5 billion annually in agricultural and ecological damage. The Arkansas Feral Hog Eradication Task Force is a group of agencies dedicated to eradicating feral hogs from the state. Accurately measuring the Arkansas feral hog population is part of that process. Sightings can be reported at the Arkansas Feral Hog Sighting Report Form.

University of Arkansas. Cooperative Extension Service.
The collection of digital images is provided as a service to Arkansas agriculture. These images represent symptoms of both pathological (infectious) and non-pathological (physiological/environmental) disorders of agronomic row crops and horticultural crops that grow in Arkansas. These photos are useful as an identification tool to growers of the crops listed.

Montgomery County Department of Parks (Maryland). Park Planning and Stewardship Division.

Natural Resources Stewardship staff (NRS) has determined that many non-native invasive plants (NNIs) known to present a significant threat to the quality and biodiversity of the natural areas occur in this 37,000-acre park system. To support the park mission to steward these lands, Montgomery County Department of Parks has prepared fact sheets for park managers and maintenance personnel with easy-to-read information about mechanical and chemical control methods for several terrestrial NNIs.

Cornell University. Agriculture and Life Sciences.
This guide provides photographs and descriptions of biological control (or biocontrol) agents of insect, disease, and weed pests in North America. It is also a tutorial on the concept and practice of biological control and integrated pest management (IPM). Whether you are an educator, a commercial grower, a student, a researcher, a land manager, or an extension or regulatory agent, we hope you will find this information useful.
DOI. Bureau of Land Management.
Colorado Parks and Wildlife.
Motorboats and sailboats must have an ANS Stamp prior to launching in Colorado in 2019. Boat owners are required to purchase the ANS Stamp and operators must retain proof of purchase (electronic or printed receipt) on his or her person, the motorboat or sailboat, when operating the vessel (C.R.S. 33-10.5-104.5). ​Funding contributes to prevention and management of ANS in the state. Thank you for protecting our waters and contributing to conservation in Colorado!
Colorado State University. College of Agricultural Sciences.
Colorado Weed Management Association.
Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management. Agriculture.
University of Nebraska - Lincoln. Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources.
Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food, and Forestry. Oklahoma Forestry Services.
With the quarantine of ash trees in Arkansas, the threat of the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) to millions of Oklahoma ash trees intensifies for southeastern Oklahoma, especially McCurtain and Le Flore counties. As the pest is literally next door, Oklahoma Forestry Services is asking Oklahomans to help prevent the infestation spread and be on the lookout and report any signs that the insect is in the state. Please notify Oklahoma Forestry Services at 405-522-6158 if you see signs of EAB infestation in ash trees. For more information about the Emerald Ash Borer visit www.forestry.ok.gov/tree-pest-alerts.
University of Nebraska - Lincoln. Cooperative Extension.
Oklahoma State University. Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources.

Missouri Department of Conservation.

Report feral hogs, don't shoot them. The take of feral hogs is prohibited on conservation areas and other lands owned, leased, or managed by the Conservation Department. Hunting hogs on other lands is strongly discouraged. Instead, report feral hog sightings to 573-522-4115, extension 3296 or online. The Conservation Department and the U.S. Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, along with other partners and hundreds of private landowners, are working to eradicate feral hogs in Missouri. When hunters shoot feral hogs, it complicates efforts to remove these pests. Hogs are social animals that travel in groups called sounders. Shooting one or two hogs scatters the sounder and makes trapping efforts aimed at catching the entire group at once more difficult, because hogs become trap-shy and more wary of baited sites. With their high reproductive rate, removing one or two hogs does not help to reduce populations. Anyone who observes a feral hog or damage caused by feral hogs should report it to the Conservation Department rather than shooting the animal so we can work together towards eradication.