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Invasive Species Resources

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Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office. Washington Invasive Species Council.

Pests looking to make their homes in Washington’s urban forests may now face a stronger defense, thanks to a new resource released this this month by the state’s Invasive Species Council. The Washington State Urban Forest Pest Readiness Playbook, published in partnership with the Washington State Department of Natural Resources (DNR), contains guidelines that towns, cities, counties and urban forestry programs can follow to address the threat of forest pests, which are estimated to cost local governments across the country an estimated $1.7 billion each year. The playbook contains self-assessments and recommended actions that communities can use to prepare for pest outbreaks. Support and funding for this effort came from 2018 Farm Bill Section 10007 through the U.S. Department of Agriculture and Plant Health Inspection Service Plant Protection and Quarantine.

Washington State Noxious Weed Control Board.

Washington State Noxious Weed Control Board.

The Washington State noxious weed list is updated every year, and all Washington residents can submit proposals to add or remove species, change the class of a listed noxious weed, or to change the designated area in which control is required for a Class B noxious weed. Anyone, including citizens, tribes, organizations, government agencies, and county noxious weed control boards may participate in the listing process by submitting a proposal or by submitting testimony about proposed changes to the noxious weed list. In fact, Washington's open, inclusive listing process is lauded by other states for its encouragement of public participation. Learn more about the listing process here.

Washington State Noxious Weed Control Board.
Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.
The Washington State Watercraft Passport is free and available for use by the public. The passport is primarily designed for Washington residents who regularly transport recreational watercraft in and out of the state, but is available to any boater. The passport can help boaters to keep track of the waters they've visited and aquatic invasive species (AIS) inspection stations they've stopped at.

Lake Champlain Basin Program.

Utah State University Extension.

Utah State University Extension.

Whatcom County Noxious Weed Control Board (Washington).

See also: Noxious Weed Fact Sheets for more species
Utah Department of Natural Resources. Division of Wildlife Resources. 
Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.
Lincoln County Noxious Weed Control Board (Washington).
See also: Weed I.D. and Options for Control for more species

Google. YouTube; United States Navy.

Google. YouTube; New York State Flower Industries.
Google. YouTube; University of Guam. Sea Grant Program.
Google. YouTube; County Seat TV (Utah).

Google. YouTube; EarthFix Media.

Google. YouTube; New York Department of Environmental Conservation.

Google. YouTube; Smithsonian Channel.

Google. YouTube; Utah State University Extension.