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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources (alphabetically), with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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National Invasive Species Awareness Week.

National Invasive Species Awareness Week (NISAW) is an international event to raise awareness about invasive species, the threat that they pose, and what can be done to prevent their spread. Representatives from local, state, federal, and regional organizations discuss legislation, policies, and improvements that can be made to prevent and manage invasive species via webinars.

SAVE THE DATE: NISAW 2022 -- Feb 28-Mar 4, 2022

Note: Archived webinars for Part I and II are available for viewing, as well as for previous year's webinars.

  • Part I -- Information and Advocacy (Feb 22-26, 2021)
    Participate in daily webinars scheduled for 1 pm CST.
  • Part II— Outreach and Education (May 15-22, 2021)
    Partners may host local events to remove invasives and educate elected officials, decision-makers, and the public on how they can help to stop the spread of invasive species and protect communities. Participate in daily webinars scheduled for 1 pm CST.

Asian Carp Regional Coordinating Committee; Flickr.

European and Mediterranean Plant Protection Organization.

Invasive Carp Regional Coordinating Committee.

CAB International.

See the people and communities from Africa and around the world who are affected by invasive species.

CAB International.

Native to Europe, Yellow toadflax and Dalmatian toadflax can typically be found on roadsides, grasslands and in crop fields. Like many other weeds, toadflaxes have been introduced to North America as decorative plants but they are now having adverse effects. Whilst these weeds may look pretty and provide decorative appeal, they soon escape cultivation and can cause some serious problems. As part of a new CABI Podcast series, CABI experts Dr Hariet Hinz and Dr Ivan Toševski were interviewed from CABI in Switzerland, who explained to us what measures they are taking to control the spread of toadflax.

DOI. National Park Service; NatureServe. Explore Natural Communities.
Google. YouTube; Honey Bee Health Coalition.
See also: Tools for Varroa Management Playlist for more videos
Google. YouTube; Great Britain Non-Native Species Secretariat.
Google. YouTube; Great Britain Non-Native Species Secretariat.

Google. YouTube; Ontario Federation of Anglers and Hunters (Canada). Ontario's Invading Species Awareness Program.

Google. YouTube; CAB International.

Google. YouTube; Lower Hudson Partnership for Regional Invasive Species Management (New York).