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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources (alphabetically), with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

Displaying 1 to 20 of 35

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University of Alaska - Anchorage. Alaska Center for Conservation Science.
Cornell University (New York). New York State Agricultural Experiment Station.
University of California. Agriculture and Natural Resources.
Provides information to both growers and home gardeners, in two distinct sub-sites -- to get the basics on the insect and the disease it can vector, how to inspect your trees, how to treat your tree if you find ACP, critical things to do to help contain the insect population and deal with Huanglongbing (HLB), as well as additional information more specific to California.
UN. World Health Organization.
Select "avian influenza" from topic list; also provides maps by geographic area.
DHHS. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
Provides situation summaries by type (wild birds, poultry, humans) and location.

California Department of Health Services; California Department of Food and Agriculture; Mosquito and Vector Control Association of California; California Vectorborne Disease Surveillance System.

California Invasive Plant Council.

CalWeedMapper is a new Web site for mapping invasive plant spread and planning regional management. Users generate a report for their region that synthesizes information into three types of strategic opportunities: surveillance, eradication and containment. Land managers can use these reports to prioritize their invasive plant management, to coordinate at the landscape level (county or larger) and to justify funding requests. For some species, CalWeedMapper also provides maps of suitable range that show where a plant might be able to grow in the future. The system was developed by the California Invasive Plant Council and is designed to stay current by allowing users to edit data.
University of Georgia. Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health.
Provides comprehensive information on cogongrass in Georgia along with links to other southeastern state efforts on cogongrass. To date, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, South Carolina and Texas have on-going research, education and/or control programs that are supported by university, state and federal agency cooperators.

European and Mediterranean Plant Protection Organization.

California Environmental Protection Agency. Pesticide Regulation.

Global Biodiversity Information Facility.

The Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF) is an international network and data infrastructure funded by the world's governments and aimed at providing anyone, anywhere, open access to data about all types of life on Earth.

Provides mapping functions for species globally. The GBIF network draws sources together through the use of data standards, such as Darwin Core, which forms the basis for the bulk of GBIF.org's index of hundreds of millions of species occurrence records. Publishers provide open access to their datasets using machine-readable Creative Commons license designations, allowing scientists, researchers, and others to apply the data in hundreds of peer-reviewed publications and policy papers each year. Many of these analyses—which cover topics from the impacts of climate change and the spread of invasive and alien pests to priorities for conservation and protected areas, food security and human health— would not be possible without this.

Note: USGS's BISON (Biodiversity Information Serving Our Nation) which provided North American species occurrence data and maps is moving away from the 10-year-old infrastructure of the existing BISON website (bison.usgs.gov) to a GBIF data portal for the U.S. (www.gbif.us) provided by the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF), which will be live on October 1, 2021.  The existing BISON website will be taken down on December 17, 2021 at which time users will be redirected to www.gbif.us.

IUCN. Species Survival Commission. Invasive Species Specialist Group.

The Global Invasive Species Database aims to increase awareness about invasive alien species and to facilitate effective prevention and management activities. The database focuses on invasive alien species that threaten native biodiversity and covers all taxonomic groups from micro-organisms to animals and plants in all ecosystems. Species information is either supplied by or reviewed by expert contributors from around the world. Provides distribution, life history, and impacts data for invasive species.
See also: 100 of the World's Worst Invasive Alien Species.

Nature Conservancy. iMapInvasives.
i is an invasive species reporting and data management tool that is on-line and map-based. The primary focus for iMapInvasives is to track invasive species locations and management efforts. iMapInvasives tools can be used by citizen scientists, land owners, natural resources managers, and others who are working to prevent, control, or manage invasive species.
See also: The iMapInvasives Network is comprised of organizations that host the iMapInvasives Network database in their respective state or province.
Gulf and Caribbean Fisheries Institute.
The Invasive Lionfish Web Portal, developed by the Gulf and Caribbean Fisheries Institute in partnership with NOAA, supports the management and control of lionfish in conservation areas along the Southeast coast of the U.S. and Caribbean.
CABI Bioscience.

JRS Biodiversity Foundation.

The Centre for Agriculture and Biosciences International (CABI) has published one of the most complete and current datasets on Invasive Alien Plants (IAP) in East and Southern Africa. This extraordinary dataset, (CABI's Africa Invasive and Alien Species data), is already being translated into new research findings and conservation action on the ground.

Canadian Food Inspection Agency.

The emerald ash borer (EAB) is a highly destructive invasive beetle which attacks and kills all species of ash, but not mountain ash, which in spite of its name, is a completely different species of tree. To help prevent the spread of EAB, the movement of ash logs and firewood out of regulated areas is restricted. Report any detections outside of regulated areas to one of the CFIA's offices.