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Invasive Species Resources

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Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program.
University of Georgia. Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health.
Provides comprehensive information on cogongrass in Georgia along with links to other southeastern state efforts on cogongrass. To date, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, South Carolina and Texas have on-going research, education and/or control programs that are supported by university, state and federal agency cooperators.
University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture.

Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation, and Forestry.

New York Invasive Species Clearinghouse.
People have been working to control aquatic invasive species in New York State for decades. In 2003, the state government took a leadership effort to identify and coordinate local and regional efforts. The Watercraft Inspection Steward Programs are a statewide effort that has stewards stationed at boat launches across the state, including Lake Erie, Lake Ontario, the Finger Lakes, the Thousand Islands, the Adirondacks, Lake Champlain, Lake George, Saratoga Lake, the Hudson River and on Long Island.
Cornell University. College of Agriculture and Life Sciences.

North Dakota State University.

A North Dakota Emerald Ash Borer First Detector Program has been cooperatively developed by the North Dakota Forest Service, North Dakota State University, North Dakota Department of Agriculture, National Plant Diagnostic Network and the USDA APHIS Plant Protection and Quarantine to train citizens of North Dakota to correctly identify symptoms and signs of EAB. If you are interested in becoming an EAB first detector in North Dakota, contact Aaron.D.Bergdahl(at)ndsu.edu. Also available is the 2014 Emerald Ash Borer First Detector Manual (PDF | 33.7 MB).

Lake Champlain Basin Program.

University of Kentucky. Kentucky Cooperative Agricultural Pest Survey.
The more people we have looking for invasive pests, the better our chances are to prevent establishment of the pest in Kentucky. If you see a pest (insect, invertebrate, plant disease) that could be one of the exotics featured on this website, let us know!